Tag Archives: COVID-19

DOES PANDEMIC PUSH INTO DRASTIC POVERTY?


India has already crossed 700,000 marks in positive COVID19 cases. Its spread does not seem to be declining; infections and death toll continue to surge frighteningly instead. The whole world is under home arrest for months to deal with this epidemic. The pandemic-induced lockdown kept a huge part of economy trailing which even though couldn’t demolish the middle or upper class as much as it derailed the lower class off the tracks. Even if ignored, half of India’s population is built with the most ignored class of society. A spot on this population can indeed pull down the economy.
At first, let’s take a look at,
What could be the impact on the economy?
• The rise in unemployment.
• The collapse of small trades like street shops.
• A slump in the tourism industry.
• The decline of the hospitality industry
• Sudden fall down of government resources.
• Rising prices making unaffordable food.
• It makes the situation even worse for poor Countries.
Keeping these points in mind, questions prevail as to the demands and need of the lower class. Most of the points mentioned above hamper this class directly; which is highly dependent on government-provided services and not on private sectors.
Labours who migrate elsewhere in the hope of better living are returning empty-handed, which on the surface has both dark and fair sides which are up to debate. However, a potential fact is always lost which takes concern upon the lives of these workers.
“16 migrant workers were crushed to death by the wheels of the train in Aurangabad station while they were resting.”
Street vendors are counting days in the hope that all will be sorted someday. Jobs like these which pay itself just to have square a meal each day with altogether zero savings whatsoever is clearly under attack.
Basic multipurpose factories and industries had to pull their shutters down under the strict notice of lockdown.
All these factors, considered, is leaving the middle and lower class with lower and lowest money in hand respectively. The direct conflict rises when the lower financial flow in the houses is stretching market flow into narrow wires, which only the upper-middle and upper class are keeping existent.
The Indian economy has fallen drastically. The poor people; though they are an integral part of our economy are going through an extremely pathetic condition.
WHO (World Health Organization) already announced that living with COVID19 is a new normal now.
Though the Government came forward to help the miserable people with some grants it cannot run indefinitely. The pandemic is temporary. This disruptive condition will be resolved one day. So, it is needless to say that our economy will recover quickly and hopefully the government will handle the disaster with proper efficiency. All states should make a head start to fight against the epidemic. The government might get the second wind which will save the country from the disaster.

COVID-19: Impact on Employment

This is imperative to that so far there had been no official estimate of loss brought about by lockdown implemented over the months due to coronavirus pandemic. A mutilate effect on an economy as large as India’s caused due a complete lockdown was impended. Unemployment across the country has ascended due to the coronavirus pandemic with sector making probably the greatest employment cuts.

The unemployment rate in the respective months of lockdown

A lockdown to restriction the spread of corona virus has seen 122 million Indians lose their positions in April alone, new information from a private examination office has appeared. Around 75% of them were little brokers and pay workers. Tamil Nadu was among the most exceedingly hit States. Its assessed unemployment rate in April was the most elevated among States and its work cooperation rate among the least. Kerala had the most reduced labour investment rate in April.

Glimpses of hopeless labourers, especially daily-wage workers, escaping urban areas filled TV screens and papers for the greater part of April. Their casual occupations, which utilize 90% of the populace, were the first to be hit as development halted, and cities suspended public vehicles.

Yet, extended curfews and the continued with the closure of organizations – and the unsure of when the lockdown will end – haven’t saved formal, secured occupations either.

Huge organizations across different divisions – media, aeronautics, retail, cordiality, autos – have reported enormous cutbacks as of late. What’s more, specialists anticipate that numerous small and medium organizations are probably going to close shop completely more critical glance at CMIE’s information shows the overwhelming impact the lockdown has had on India’s composed economy. Of the 122 million who have lost their positions, 91.3 million were little merchants and workers. In any case, a genuinely huge number of salaried specialists – 17.8 million – and independently employed individuals – 18.2 million – have likewise lost work.

India’s unemployment rate increased to 26.2 per cent in the third week stretch of April amid coronavirus lockdown, a report said. The all-inclusive lockdown is just expected to additionally hit the work economic situations, Mahesh Vyas, Managing Director and CEO, Center for Monitoring Indian Economy (CMIE), said. “The work rate has tumbled from 40 per cent in February to 26 per cent now. This is a steep fall of 14 rate focuses. This infers 14 per cent of the working-age populace has lost their jobs. The working-age populace is of the request for a billion,” Mahesh Vyas likewise said in an article on the CMIE site. Fourteen crore individuals are relied upon to have lost work in the lockdown time frame, he said. Thus, the pace of work support has plunged to 35.4 per cent from 35.5 per cent. The work rate has now plunged to 26.1 per cent as against 27 per cent in the previous week, it included.

The worker markets are under equivalent pressure both in provincial and urban territories, he included. The pace of unemployment in provincial India stands higher at 26.7 per cent as against urban 25.1 per cent. “During the most recent seven day stretch of March and in the initial fourteen days of April, the unemployment rate drifted around 23-24 per cent. In the 1st week, it was 23.8 per cent; in the second week it dropped a piece to 23.4 per cent yet in the third week it bobbed back to 24 per cent. The differences were minor and all in all, they affirmed that the unemployment rate had for sure increased to around 24 per cent following the lockdown,” Mahesh Vyas further mentioned. The instability of the unemployment rate in urban India is additionally astounding, he said. The unemployment rate in urban India flooded to 30 and 31 per cent, individually in the first and second weeks of the lockdown. “At that point, in the accompanying fourteen days, it fell rather strongly to 23 and 25 per cent. This is a fairly sharp fall in the joblessness rate in urban India in spite of the fact that it remains very raised,” the report said.

In the meantime, the joblessness rate remained at 8.74 per cent in March, most noteworthy since August 2016 when demonetization occurred, an ongoing report by CMIE said. In August 2016, the unemployment rate was 9.59 per cent. While the joblessness rate was recorded at 9.35 per cent in urban zones, it remained at 8.45 per cent in provincial pieces of the nation, the information likewise appeared. In February, it was recorded at 7.78 per cent.

Unemployment rose to 24 per cent on May 17, 2020. This was perhaps an aftereffect of a diminishing sought after just as the disturbance of the workforce looked up by organizations. Moreover, this caused a GVA loss of nine per cent for the Indian economy that month.

Who suffered the most?

The direst outcome is for workers who don’t have a secure job. In the travel industry, for example, this class incorporates individuals who either work in temporary transient agreements or even without them. This incorporates guides, workers, cleaners working in shops, servers in cafés, vegetable sellers, meat, and flower vendors.

For these labourers, the infection flare-up has implied lost vocation. Industry body CII said that the greater part of the travel industry and accommodation industry can go wiped out with a potential loss of more than 20 million occupations if recuperation in the business extends past October 2020.

The content is comparative in numerous different administrations enterprises, in assembling and non-fabricating areas, for example, development. Lower development on account of falling interest and flexibly imperatives would make new occupation creation harder, yet besides, hurt the individuals who are now hired. Generally, around 136 million non-agrarian employments are at impending danger, gauges dependent on National Sample Survey (NSS) and Periodic Labor Force Surveys (PLFS) information proposed. These are individuals who don’t have a composed agreement and incorporate casual workers, the individuals who work in the non-enrolled small-scale industry, enlisted small organizations, and even the self-employed.

While the daily paid workers are enduring the worst part in the primary period of the pandemic, organizations across businesses could give termination notice on momentary agreements next. More than 5,000,000 Indians have work contracts not exactly a year in incumbency.

Demographic disaster

The COVID-19 pandemic comes at a troublesome segment time for India and would just aggravate an approaching employment emergency. India needs to make almost 10 million vacancies consistently to ingest individuals moving into the working-age populace, other than those that are as of now jobless.

The Adecco Group India, a staffing organization, has planned the effect of COVID-19 spread across work in some Indian companies. It said around 9,000,000 occupations can be decreased over the assembling groups of materials, capital merchandise, textiles, food items, metals, plastics, elastic, and gadgets. Manpower cuts in the automobiles began last quarter due to falling deals.

The coronavirus circumstance will just intensify joblessness. Adecco assessed that the vehicle business can lose up to a million occupations in the vendor biological system, forefront jobs, and the semi-talented. Around 600,000 ground and bolster jobs on contract in the avionics business are in danger.

Unmistakably, a work advertises crunch right currently can without much of a stretch transform into a bad dream. Other than the chance of social agitation, expect more requests for additional reservations in government occupations.

“The ramifications of this emergency will be critical. We will have less financial space to make truly necessary interests in, for instance, instruction, aptitudes, safeguard social insurance, and foundation. This won’t simply keep us from pushing ahead however will slow down us. Our enormous and developing youth populace will be additionally disappointed, conceivably prodding social conflict, wrongdoing, and flimsiness,” she included.136 million at risk

Santosh Mehrotra, a human development economist, and professor at the Centre for Informal Sector and Labour Studies at Jawaharlal Nehru University pegs India’s labour force at 495 million. In 2017-18, about 30 million were unemployed, which implies that 465 million are currently employed.

Who among the already hired are the most helpless ones? The simple answer is those that don’t have the security for their job; those with no social assurance. They are graded as “impermanent” labourers.

The portion of the formal segment was fixed at 90.7% generally and 83.5% in the non-agriculture areas. Most gauges in the paper depend on NSS and PLFS information. Since there are 260 million individuals hired in India’s non-farm unit (agribusiness utilizes another 205 million), the number of casual specialists aggregates around 217 million across administrations, producing, and non-production zone.

One shade of insecure work among the casual groups is those that have no composed employments contract. Numbers sorted out from the Mehrotra paper proposes that around 28 million have no composed activity contracts in assembling; 49 million in non-producing; and 59 million in administrations in 2017-18. In general, around 136 million labourers in India, or over a large portion of the absolute employee hired in non-agriculture parts, have no agreements and remain at risk in the repercussion of the corona pandemic.

They can be terminated without notice or severance. Most daily wage workers or informal workers fall in this section. Their torment is found in Twitter and TV channels—recordings of several vagrant labourers strolling back to their towns. A lot of them work in buildings. Work in land development, for instance, is affected because real estate dispatches and deals are travelled south given that lower economic development is presently a conviction.

In the United States workforce, 44% of individuals are engaged in low-salary, temporary employment—the fragment of the working populace that is turning into the first to lose their positions because of the pandemic. Left to confront expanded monetary load, they are getting scared of the fact that where and when their next pay will originate from. They are even very nearly thinking if their families will have the option to endure this epic emergency.

With the loss of their occupations, they can’t pay for necessities including rent, utilities, and food. Additionally, schools were providing meals for youngsters, presently leaving these kids in danger of confronting hunger with schools being shut. With fears of appetite, vagrancy, and certain misery on the ascent for this effectively defenceless populace.

Because of this desperate circumstance, embrace relief is propelling a battle with your assistance to give the same number of individuals in the U.S. with money related help for lease, food, and utilities during the Coronavirus pandemic. one just can’t leave this defenceless populace to confront this difficulty all alone and realize that particularly amid aggregate concern.

The trickle-down effect

Between February and April 2020, the share of households that experienced a fall in income shot up to nearly 46 per cent. Inflation rates on goods and services including food products and fuel were expected to rise later this year. Social distancing resulted in job losses, specifically those Indian society’s lower economic strata. Several households terminated domestic help services – essentially an unorganized monthly-paying job. Most Indians spent a large amount of time engaging in household chores themselves, making it the most widely practised lockdown activity.

The Predicament of the MSMEs


The declaration of the COVID-19 as a global pandemic gave rise to a state of confusion amongst nations. With people foraging for an answer during these uncertain times, Google reported that “since the first week of February, search interest in coronavirus increased by +260% globally.” The pandemic was successful in not only putting a dent in the health-related sectors but also in the economic sphere. McKinsey and Company revealed that the onset of this pandemic made huge ripples around the globe. The effects of these ripples were further built up with the discovery of the situation of several jobs around the globe. A recent data of the International Labour Organization (ILO) with regards to the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on labour market revealed the ruinous effects it had on workers in the informal economy and on hundreds of millions of enterprises worldwide.
The declaration of COVID-19 as a pandemic in March saw and continues to see a steep surge in unemployment. The sharp drop in work as a result of the outbreak meant that around 1.6 billion workers in the informal economy (approximately 50% of the global workforce) face the danger of levelling of their livelihoods warned the International Labour Organization. “ILO Monitor third edition: COVID-19 and the world of work,” brought to light that the drop in working hours especially in the current quarter of 2020 is expected to be notably worse than anticipated. “Compared to pre-crisis levels (Q4 2019), 10.5 per cent deterioration is now expected, equivalent to 305 million full-time jobs (assuming a 48-hour working week). The previous estimate was for a 6.7 per cent drop, equivalent to 195 million full-time workers. This is due to the prolongation and extension of lockdown measures,” stated a document issued by the International Labour Organization regarding the crisis.
The disturbance in the economic sphere has led to a damage of billions of informal economy workers (representing the most vulnerable in the labour market), out of which a worldwide total of 2 billion and a global workforce of 3.3 billion suffered massive impairment to their livelihood. The ILO revealed that the initial months of the crisis is estimated to have resulted in a drop of 60% in the income of informal workers globally. Statistics divulged that a drop of 81% in Africa and the Americas, 21.6% in Asia and the Pacific, and 70% in Europe and Central Asia was witnessed. The challenge regarding employment has been especially critical for small businesses. Firms with fewer than 100 employees have been seen to be more vulnerable when compared to 40% of the large private-sector employers.
Moody’s Investor Service claimed the downgrading of Indian economy by estimating 0% growth in FY21. The study laid bare that the fiscal measures introduced by the Government were unlikely to offset lower consumption and slow-moving economic activity. Berstein entertained -7% growth, whereas both Goldman Sachs and Normura forecasted a 5% contraction in the Indian economy. The report further stated that although the direct fiscal impact of the policy reforms 1-2% of GDP, it would provide limited impetus to the furtherance of the economy. A strain in the fiscal deficit would contribute to an increase in future debt in debt-to-GDP term reported Moody’s. Moreover, the Investor Service opined that Indian Government’s extension of ‘working capital loans’ to micro, small, and medium enterprises (MSMEs) will not suffice and shield from the economic shock they are facing now as they were already facing financial strain well before the crisis.
The MSME sector which is among the worst-hit, globally, accounts for 33.4% of India’s output along with a whopping 45% of Indian export. These enterprises, since the day of the announcement of the pandemic, have been facing the possibility of extinction. The MSMEs that rely upon daily transaction to stay afloat have been facing serious problems as a result of thee nationwide lockdown. A survey conducted by All India Manufacturers’ Organisation (AIMO) that covered 5000 MSMEs showed how 71% of the small businesses were unable to pay salaries since March. Moreover, the findings of the survey revealed that more than 40% of the businesses would shut shop sooner or later. The CII CEOs snap poll disclosed that almost 54% of company heads predicted job losses irrespective of the sector they are in whereas 45% foresee 15-30% layoffs. For instance, one of the most famous auto-manufacturing company, Maruti Suzuki informed that the production in April was ‘zero’. The predicament has been visible across different manufacturing industries, including textiles, chemicals, etc. TransUnion Cibil discussed that there was a risk of 2.3 lakh crores worth loan might become non-performing. Moreover, with the increase in the demand for cash flow, there will emerge issues that are expected to prevail even with relaxations introduced by the government.
To give a shove to the MSMEs and inject life-blood to this sector:

  1. GOI declared a cut in a policy of repo rate by 75 basis points to 4.4%.
  2. More than 3 lakh crore rupees was injected into the system.
  3. Moreover, it allowed a 3-month moratorium on the payment of instalment with regards to existing loans.
  4. Reserve Bank of India (RBI) opened another window of 50,000 rupees for refinancing. Based on this, post receiving this money, banks will be mandated to invest within one month. RBI also reduced liquidity coverage ratio to 80% whilst providing a special financial scheme to All India Financial Institutions (AIFIs) at repo rate.
  5. Emergency credit lines have been created by several banks.
  6. A low-interest rate of 5% has been declared.
  7. Various business continuity measures have been adopted by the RBI.
    Nitin Gadkari, Minister for Road Transport & Highways, Minister of Shipping and the Minister of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises, explained that Government of India has been working tirelessly on policies concerning the MSMEs with focus on entrepreneurship development. The sector that accounts for nearly 30% of the economy of Indian nation needs a robust economic plan so that it can get its engine running once again after COVID-19 ceases to exist. The post-pandemic economic scenario would be one that would introduce capital scarcity to the globe. Nations all around need to conclusively come up with a plan that would be mainly concerned with reviving the MSME sector. A comprehensive system that would get back the MSMEs on track is the need of the hour.

COVAXIN

What is Covaxin?

It has been developed by the company Bharat Biotech India (BBIL) in collaboration with ICMR’s National Institute of Virology (NIV). It is an “inactivated” vaccine — one made by using particles of the Covid-19 virus that were killed, making them unable to infect or replicate. Injecting particular doses of these particles serves to build immunity by helping the body create antibodies against the dead virus, according to BBIL.

News about Covaxin

Earlier this week, Bharat Biotech announced that it had developed a vaccine against the novel coronavirus, named Covaxin, together with the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) and the National Institute of Virology (NIV), Pune. The company had also received permission from the Drug Controller General of India (DCGI) to begin human trials, expected to commence in August.

Bharat Biotech is a reputed drug manufacturer that delivers four billion doses around the world for infections like rotavirus, hepatitis, Zika, Japanese encephalitis and others. However, its claim that Covaxin is indigenous – advanced, among others, by managing director Krishna Ella – raises some doubts.

According to Bharat Biotech, Covaxin is an inactivated vaccine developed from an Indian strain of the novel coronavirus isolated by NIV. No further information has been provided, especially about the nature of the vaccine or how it was developed. There have been no prior announcements either about when the process of developing such a vaccine was begun.

ICMR transferred the strain NIV had isolated to Biotech Bharat on May 9. The company published its press release on June 29. So there were only 50 days in between, during which time the company should have developed the inactivated vaccine, conducted preclinical animal trials (with mice and hamsters, according to the company), and sent its reports to be evaluated and approved by DCGI. Although ICMR had promised to expedite the process, animal trials with mice typically take at least three months to conclude.

A related issue is that animal trials for COVID-19 can only be conducted with hACE2 transgenic mice, as ‘normal’ mice can’t get infected with the novel coronavirus. These mice need to be shipped from the US, Europe or China.

These issues therefore raise concerns about whether Bharat Biotech could really have proceeded to the human-trials phase of vaccine development within only 50 days of receiving the inactivated virus from NIV.

Collaboration with US company

Bharat Biotech has currently invested in two other vaccines: CoroFlu in collaboration with FluGen Inc. and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and an inactivated rabies vaccine vehicle for coronavirus proteins developed along with Matthis Schnell, director of the Jefferson Vaccine Centre (JVC), Pennsylvania. The latter is of interest.

On May 20, Bharat Biotech announced its collaboration with JVC as well as the license it had received to conduct clinical trials, and to produce and deliver vaccines in 80 countries excluding the US, Europe and Japan. On April 7, JVC announced a promising vaccine candidate named Coravax.

Coravax uses an inactivated rabies vaccine to carry the spike protein of the novel coronavirus. The spike protein attaches to a host cell and causes an infection, so experts expected this vaccine to trigger a good immune response on the body’s part. Schnell corroborated this response following preliminary tests with animals. Schnell added that JVC would need one more month to complete follow-up studies.

Bharat Biotech hasn’t shared any technical details of Covaxin. But based on what we already know, there appears to be room for the possibility that Covaxin is Coravax by another name – and by another viral strain. And even if the vaccine is wholly indigenous, the timelines for the animal trials don’t line up.

When does ICMR plan to launch it?

Aiming to make it available for public use by August 15, Bhargava wrote to the 12 trial sites to ensure “all” clinical trials were conducted by then. While BBIL’s application with the Clinical Trials Registry of India (CTRI) shows it plans to complete enrolment of trial participants by July 13, Bhargava has directed the sites to complete enrolment by July 7.

Is this even achievable?

A vaccine usually goes through three phases of human trials. The Central Drugs Standard Control Organization has given approvals for phase I and II trials so far. According to details from CTRI, BBIL in its application estimated phase I and II trials to take a year and three months, including at least a month for phase I alone.

Experts have questioned how all three phases can be concluded within a month and a half. “I would find it very surprising if it is done. Even the most ambitious companies in the world that are in more advanced stages of development for their Covid-19 vaccines have a longer time-frame. Even having all the trial results, with safety and efficacy data, by August 15 is difficult. This raises several questions,” said Dr Anant Bhan, Researcher, Global Health, Bioethics and Health Policy.

While vaccine trials can be fast-tracked, it still takes over a year to launch the product, experts said. In a pandemic, emergency-use approval can be given if data from the first two trial phases is compelling enough, said an expert on condition of anonymity. This would allow the launch without the third phase being conducted, but this approval would likely be given with riders to submit additional data and adverse event reports.

EFFECT OF COVID-19 ON RURAL INDIA


COVID-19 took the entire world by tremors. Countries are put under lockdown, economic activities are abandoned, measures are taken as if it’s a war of worlds. People were completely alien to such a health hazard. Every industry faced its consequences. Seventy percent of the Indian population lives in Rural backgrounds, lockdown had a severe impact on this 70% population. People in Rural Areas have completely thrived for Amenities and services and this caused a major disruption in the common working of Agricultural as well as Non-Agricultural livelihoods.
IMPACT ON PEOPLE DEPENDENT ON AGRICULTURE
India is a Nation with a big chunk of its GDP (Gross Domestic Product) belonging to the Agricultural Sector. Rural areas especially are mostly dependent on Agricultural or related activities.
A complete lockdown was announced by Central Government on 25 March which is the end of the Rabi crop season. The season when farmers expect to get gains for their hard toil of one complete cropping season. The timings of lockdown disallowed many to sell their crops at profitable prices, lack of cold storage facilities and transportation resulted in crop failure impacting many. The other major sources of income for people based in the Agriculture sector are dairy and horticulture they were hit the hardest.
Dairy-based livelihoods:-
People who were employed in Dairy product-based services we’re majorly affected by lack of transportation and a big dip in product demand. Dairy products except Ghee do not last long, the need immediate dispersal of products to consumers but lockdown made large voids in the transportation chains resulting in losses to Dairies.
Horticulture-based livelihood:-
India is the second-largest fruit producer in the world, Horticulture output in total is about 313.9 million metric tons. Not every fruit and vegetable grow everywhere, these are extremely area-specific. The closure of the wholesale markets resulted in differences between demand and supply chain. The horticulture sector is majorly dependent on intermediaries, the closing of their shutters lead to a devastating outcome.
Fisheries & Poultries
The same reasons cited above affected fisheries and poultries too. A narrative due to rumored speculation of virus transfer from these products too caused a dent on this sector.
Agricultural based livelihood certainly got disturbed by Lockdown but the points that most of these were placed under essential services, and favoring government policies proved out to be a breather.
• IMPACT ON PEOPLE DEPENDENT ON NON-AGRICULTURAL ACTIVITIES
Non- Agricultural Sector got more severely affected. I need not remind you that most of the Indian population resides in Rural surroundings and majorly contributes to Nations Growth. The non-Agricultural sector comprises about 47% of the Indian Economy. The big portion of Indian workforce hails from Rural backgrounds .We need not look at all of it as number but as real-life individuals and groups who face massive losses. Non-Agricultural Sector majorly comprises of two types.

I. Manufacturing Sector:- This sector faced impacts of closure of international borders as all the imports-exports got affected, closure of domestic markets deepened this wound, all employees were made to rest at home. A high number of individuals we’re terminated from their jobs and it all impacted regular rural and urban households.
II. Services Sector:- All Services except essential, emergency and healthcare services were put to close. This too impacted a humongous number of households. Gyms, Schools, Restaurants, Hotels, Entertainment parks, Theatres, Transportation all these are yet to get the green signal from authorities. Like every other sector, this sector too will take lots of effort to recover.
Logically speaking it is impossible to talk about India excluding rural India. Indian economy took a deep dig, GDP slipped to straight 9% and it will take time and great efforts to recover, and we as Indians are ready to get it back on track.
Among other negatives of this pandemic, one positive for India that shone brightly is self-sufficiency and each capability of each unit to function by itself. Rural India hence sets an example to the world of Indian potential.
By:- Shubham Yadav

Happy National Doctor’s Day

Every year on 1st July India celebrates National Doctor’s Day in honor of Bharat Ratna Dr. Bidhan Chandra Roy former chief minister of West Bengal and someone who represented the best of his profession at a critical time in India’s modern history.

He is still considered the greatest Chief Minister of West Bengal and a visionary of developing the State as after independence lot of industrial development took place in the State.
He was the one to establish the Indian Medical Association in 1928 and the Medical Council of India. He also played a crucial role in establishing the Indian Institute of Mental Health, the Infectious Disease Hospital, and even Kolkata’s first-ever postgraduate medical college.

My Tribute to our life Saviors

And on this Doctor’s Day salute to all the doctors and healthcare workers for their selfless service. In this pandemic, they are real-life heroes, bringing hope in these difficult situations. Keeping us safe, fighting the coronavirus war at The frontline. Their invaluable contribution makes people recover from this dreadful disease.

Free food grain scheme extension till November : PM Modi

PM Modi addressing Nation

Keeping the pandemic in mind Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Tuesday announced the extension of a key government scheme for free food grain to more than 80 crore poor people till November.

PM Modi’s announcement came during his address to the nation as the country’s coronavirus disease (Covid-19) tally surged beyond 5.66 lakh.

“This time of festivals also increases needs and expenses. Keeping all these things in mind, it has been decided that the Pradhan Mantri Garib Kalyan Anna Yojana should now be extended till Diwali and Chhath Puja, that is, by the end of November,” PM Modi said in his sixth address to the nation since the coronavirus pandemic started.

“More than Rs 90,000 crore will be spent in this expansion of Pradhan Mantri Garib Kalyan Ann Yojna. If you add the expenses of the last three months to it, then it becomes almost one and a half lakh crore rupees,” he added during the virtual address.

PM Modi said that “hardworking farmers and honest taxpayers” have helped push the government’s food scheme as he thanked them for their efforts.

“Today, if the government is able to provide free food grains to the poor and the needy, the credit goes to two sections. First, the hardworking farmers of our country and second, the honest taxpayers. I thank you from my heart,” he said.

PM Modi also urges people of the country to continue to follow the rules of WHO, wearing masks, washing hands, and maintaining the distance of two-yard. He also stressed not to be careless about these rules.

“With this resolve, we 130 crore countrymen have to work together with the resolution to work and move forward. Once again I pray for you and urge all of you to be healthy, keep following the two-yard rule, use gamchas, and mask always. Do not be careless,” he said.

“Earlier, we were very cautious about masks, maintaining a two-yard distance, washing hands several times a day for 20 seconds,” the Prime Minister said.

He also appreciated that the ruled were followed by the government, local body entities, and citizens of the country.

“The rules were followed very seriously during the lockdown. Now governments, local body entities, citizens of the country need to show the same vigilance again,” he added.

India reported 18,522 new Covid-19 cases in the last 24 hours, slightly lower than Sunday’s record of 19,906, according to the Union health ministry Tuesday.

India is behind only the United States, Brazil, and Russia in total cases with more than 566,000 infections. More than 16,800 people have died in the country.

SHAILAJA TEACHER: corona virus slayer

Kerala, which recorded India’s first three corona virus cases,has been successful in flattening the curve of new infections. The southern state has reported 3,451 cases, of which 1809 patients were discharged after receiving treatment . Twenty-two deaths have been recorded so far in Kerala.

Kerala Health Minister KK Shailaja popularly known as Shailaja Teacher has been hailed for effectively control the Covid-19 curve in the state , at a time when the entire country was devasted by the disease. Kerala was apparently successful to fight with the virus because of timely intervention by the Minister.

Recently she was honoured by the United Nations during the celebration of Public Service Day for tackling the Covid-19 pandemic Effectively .The UN observed Public Service Day on 23 rd June to honour those who risking their life and health to deliver essential public services amid the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic.

K.K SHAILAJA attending UN Public Service Day Celebration

the event was held at virtual platform and saw the digital participatation of UN secretary General Antonio Guterres and other top dignitaries

Current status of the animals in COVID-19 pandemic

Have you ever wondered while you’re at home safely; the doctors, nurses, police, army are the real warriors fighting in this pandemic. But what about the animals around us and in the wildlife sanctuaries? The pets may be safe, but the lone strangers are in need, and we need to help them. In this situation, the activities of poachers have been increasing a lot and can be a significant threat to wild animals, including the endangered animals.

Let’s start with something positive first. One of the facts that researchers were in shock after noticing the penguins are so happy after enjoying with less sea ice; it made them roam and dive freely in the water. Also, the bees, due to less pollution, are now able to find flowers easily. You may also see news like the animals in the zoo are roaming freely; nature is recovering, and much more. But that isn’t the reality. There’s a dark secret hidden behind these hysterical scenes.

A happy penguin looking at you while reading this article

People being unemployed in rural areas prone to move towards illegal activities. In Kenya, also Cambodia and some parts of Africa where bushmeat is increasing a lot. The rhinos are in danger for their horn, although there is no possible way to supply them due to restrictions. The protection in those areas might have reduced due to severe health complications in the countries, so they get an easy escape and a great start planning to earn money. The current situations have worsened day by day as the patients are increasing, beds are reducing, and the government is more focused on healthcare systems.

The technology wants to lend hands to help, and some of them did apply the methodology. Kruger National Park in Africa is using drones as a part of Postcode Meerkat and also day night vision cameras to keep an eye on such activities. The most crucial fact is that the number of wildlife animals is decreasing day by day, and most importantly, the diseases are being spread due to such activities. The worst nightmare in Africa, Ebola, also the SARS and AIDS have all originated due to the animals.

A typical seafood market

The wet market, banned several times in China, still functional in some areas leading to the outbreak, which has re-begun when the virus was found in the seafood market. It’s nearly a wartime scenario in the country. The swab testing recently is done, and guess what, the rise in the cases is observed. If the guidelines are not followed, people looking for freedom might lose their life permanently while fighting with the self-immunity, not even with someone else. Your body is a battlefield now; you have to fight for your system and not by raising questions to others.

At the time of writing this article, the cases are at 10 million, and still, there is no seriousness among the people. Being at home doesn’t mean you’re free; you need to contribute your work and show dedication towards society. We are a social animal, and yes, we also need to be controlled to control the diversion to other illegal tasks.

Maharashtra CM urges Mandals to limit the height of Ganesh Idol due to Pandemic

Maharashtra CM Uddav Thackeray

Chief Minister Uddhav Thackeray on Friday appealed to all Ganesh mandals in the State to restrict the Ganapati idol size to four feet, observe austerity in celebrations, and follow safety norms during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Exactly after two months, on August 22, the auspicious festival of 11 days Ganesh Utsav will be started.

The freedom fighter of India Lok Manya Bal Gangadhar Tilak turned this private household festival to a public event. We have been celebrating Ganesh Utsav since 1893.

The maximum height of Ganesh idol ranges from 18 to 22 feet in Mumbai. It is a touchy issue. Ganesh festival organizers of Pune, Mumbai had held a meeting with Chief Minister of Maharashtra Uddhav Thackeray and Deputy Chief Minister Ajit Pawar on Friday.

Mr. Thackeray said, “Extravagant celebrations and huge Ganesha idols are an attraction of the festival in Mumbai and Pune. But we will have to avoid them at least this year. I have held talks with representatives of mandals from different parts of the State, and we unanimously agreed to celebrate the festival with discipline and safety.”

The maximum height of Ganesh idol ranges from 18 to 22 feet in Mumbai. And a huge number of people assemble every year at the large idols t attend Aarti. Due to the pandemic this year the crowd needs to be controlled even in pandals too.

The CM said it has also been unanimously decided to restrict the height of idols to four feet. “In the case of bigger idols, the manpower required to increases. We need to avoid crowds. We will have to prevent crowds even in pandals. Even the immersion will have to be performed with as few people as possible.”

He said the Dahi handi festival, too, has been canceled this year.

“We could not organize the annual pilgrimage of warkaris. Such actions are an example of Maharashtra’s commitment to social work and discipline,” he said. Dahi handi organizers such as Sena MLA Pratap Sarnaik have donated 1 crore to anti-COVID-19 fund instead, he said.

“We have to celebrate the festival with discipline and safety, and crowding has to be avoided at all cost,” he said.

The tallest of the Ganesh murtis ranges between 18 to 22 feet in Mumbai, where the annual festival draws a huge crowd. “Because of the Covid-19 pandemic, we have to celebrate Ganeshutsav simply. Devotion to the Lord Ganesha is more important…