Category Archives: Book Reviews

The last leaf🍁

IN A LITTLE district west of Washington Square the streets have run crazy and broken themselves into small strips called “places.” These “places” make strange angles and curves. One street crosses itself a time or two. An artist once discovered a valuable possibility in this street. Suppose a collector with a bill for paints, paper and canvas should, in traversing this route, suddenly meet himself coming back, without a cent having been paid on account!So, to quaint old Greenwich Village the art people soon came prowling, hunting for north windows and eighteenth-century gables and Dutch attics and low rents. Then they imported some pewter mugs and a chafing dish or two from Sixth avenue, and became a “colony.”At the top of a squatty, three-story brick Sue and Johnsy had their studio. “Johnsy” was familiar for Joanna. One was from Maine; the other from California. They had met at the table d’hote of an Eighth street “Delmonico’s,” and found their tastes in art, chicory salad and bishop sleeves so congenial that the joint studio resulted.That was in May. In November a cold, unseen stranger, whom the doctors called Pneumonia, stalked about the colony, touching one here and there with his icy fingers. Over on the east side this ravager strode boldly, smiting his victims by scores, but his feet trod slowly through the maze of the narrow and moss-grown “places.”Mr. Pneumonia was not what you would call a chivalric old gentleman. A mite of a little woman with blood thinned by California zephyrs was hardly fair game for the red-fisted, short-breathed old duffer. But Johnsy he smote; and she lay, scarcely moving, on her painted iron bedstead, looking through the small Dutch window-panes at the blank side of the next brick house.One morning the busy doctor invited Sue into the hallway with a shaggy, gray eyebrow.“She has one chance in—let us say, ten,” he said, as he shook down the mercury in his clinical thermometer. “And that chance is for her to want to live. This way people have of lining-up on the side of the undertaker makes the entire pharmacopeia look silly. Your little lady has made up her mind that she’s not going to get well. Has she anything on her mind?”“She—she wanted to paint the Bay of Naples some day,” said Sue.“Paint?—bosh! Has she anything on her mind worth thinking about twice—a man, for instance?”“A man?” said Sue, with a jew’s-harp twang in her voice. “Is a man worth—but, no, doctor; there is nothing of the kind.”“Well, it is the weakness, then,” said the doctor. “I will do all that science, so far as it may filter through my efforts, can accomplish. But whenever my patient begins to count the carriages in her funeral procession I subtract 50 per cent. from the curative power of medicines. If you will get her to ask one question about the new winter styles in cloak sleeves I will promise you a one-in-five chance for her, instead of one in ten.”After the doctor had gone Sue went into the workroom and cried a Japanese napkin to a pulp. Then she swaggered into Johnsy’s room with her drawing board, whistling ragtime.Johnsy lay, scarcely making a ripple under the bedclothes, with her face toward the window. Sue stopped whistling, thinking she was asleep.She arranged her board and began a pen-and-ink drawing to illustrate a magazine story. Young artists must pave their way to Art by drawing pictures for magazine stories that young authors write to pave their way to Literature.As Sue was sketching a pair of elegant horseshow riding trousers and a monocle on the figure of the hero, an Idaho cowboy, she heard a low sound, several times repeated. She went quickly to the bedside.Johnsy’s eyes were open wide. She was looking out the window and counting—counting backward.“Twelve,” she said, and a little later “eleven”; and then “ten,” and “nine”; and then “eight” and “seven,” almost together.Sue looked solicitously out the window. What was there to count? There was only a bare, dreary yard to be seen, and the blank side of the brick house twenty feet away. An old, old ivy vine, gnarled and decayed at the roots, climbed half way up the brick wall. The cold breath of autumn had stricken its leaves from the vine until its skeleton branches clung, almost bare, to the crumbling bricks.“What is it, dear?” asked Sue.“Six,” said Johnsy, in almost a whisper. “They’re falling faster now. Three days ago there were almost a hundred. It made my head ache to count them. But now it’s easy. There goes another one. There are only five left now.”“Five what, dear? Tell your Sudie.”“Leaves. On the ivy vine. When the last one falls I must go, too. I’ve known that for three days. Didn’t the doctor tell you?”“Oh, I never heard of such nonsense,” complained Sue, with magnificent scorn. “What have old ivy leaves to do with your getting well? And you used to love that vine so, you naughty girl. Don’t be a goosey. Why, the doctor told me this morning that your chances for getting well real soon were—let’s see exactly what he said—he said the chances were ten to one! Why, that’s almost as good a chance as we have in New York when we ride on the street cars or walk past a new building. Try to take some broth now, and let Sudie go back to her drawing, so she can sell the editor man with it, and buy port wine for her sick child, and pork chops for her greedy self.”“You needn’t get any more wine,” said Johnsy, keeping her eyes fixed out the window. “There goes another. No, I don’t want any broth. That leaves just four. I want to see the last one fall before it gets dark. Then I’ll go, too.”“Johnsy, dear,” said Sue, bending over her, “will you promise me to keep your eyes closed, and not look out the window until I am done working? I must hand those drawings in by tomorrow. I need the light, or I would draw the shade down.”“Couldn’t you draw in the other room?” asked Johnsy, coldly.“I’d rather be here by you,” said Sue. “Besides, I don’t want you to keep looking at those silly ivy leaves.”“Tell me as soon as you have finished,” said Johnsy, closing her eyes, and lying white and still as a fallen statue, “because I want to see the last one fall. I’m tired of waiting. I’m tired of thinking. I want to turn loose my hold on everything, and go sailing down, down, just like one of those poor, tired leaves.”“Try to sleep,” said Sue. “I must call Behrman up to be my model for the old hermit miner. I’ll not be gone a minute. Don’t try to move ’till I come back.”Old Behrman was a painter who lived on the ground floor beneath them. He was past sixty and had a Michael Angelo’s Moses beard curling down from the head of a satyr along the body of an imp. Behrman was a failure in art. Forty years he had wielded the brush without getting near enough to touch the hem of his Mistress’s robe. He had been always about to paint a masterpiece, but had never yet begun it. For several years he had painted nothing except now and then a daub in the line of commerce or advertising. He earned a little by serving as a model to those young artists in the colony who could not pay the price of a professional. He drank gin to excess, and still talked of his coming masterpiece. For the rest he was a fierce little old man, who scoffed terribly at softness in any one, and who regarded himself as especial mastiff-in-waiting to protect the two young artists in the studio above.Sue found Behrman smelling strongly of juniper berries in his dimly lighted den below. In one corner was a blank canvas on an easel that had been waiting there for twenty-five years to receive the first line of the masterpiece. She told him of Johnsy’s fancy, and how she feared she would, indeed, light and fragile as a leaf herself, float away when her slight hold upon the world grew weaker.Old Behrman, with his red eyes plainly streaming, shouted his contempt and derision for such idiotic imaginings.“Vass!” he cried. “Is dere people in de world mit der foolishness to die because leafs dey drop off from a confounded vine? I haf not heard of such a thing. No, I will not bose as a model for your fool hermit-dunderhead. Vy do you allow dot silly pusiness to come in der prain of her? Ach, dot poor leetle Miss Yohnsy.”“She is very ill and weak,” said Sue, “and the fever has left her mind morbid and full of strange fancies. Very well, Mr. Behrman, if you do not care to pose for me, you needn’t. But I think you are a horrid old—old flibbertigibbet.”“You are just like a woman!” yelled Behrman. “Who said I will not bose? Go on. I come mit you. For half an hour I haf peen trying to say dot I am ready to bose. Gott! dis is not any blace in which one so goot as Miss Yohnsy shall lie sick. Some day I vill baint a masterpiece, and ve shall all go away. Gott! yes.”Johnsy was sleeping when they went upstairs. Sue pulled the shade down to the window-sill, and motioned Behrman into the other room. In there they peered out the window fearfully at the ivy vine. Then they looked at each other for a moment without speaking. A persistent, cold rain was falling, mingled with snow. Behrman, in his old blue shirt, took his seat as the hermit miner on an upturned kettle for a rock.When Sue awoke from an hour’s sleep the next morning she found Johnsy with dull, wide-open eyes staring at the drawn green shade.“Pull it up; I want to see,” she ordered, in a whisper.Wearily Sue obeyed.But, lo! after the beating rain and fierce gusts of wind that had endured through the livelong night, there yet stood out against the brick wall one ivy leaf. It was the last on the vine. Still dark green near its stem, but with its serrated edges tinted with the yellow of dissolution and decay, it hung bravely from a branch some twenty feet above the ground.“It is the last one,” said Johnsy. “I thought it would surely fall during the night. I heard the wind. It will fall to-day, and I shall die at the same time.”“Dear, dear!” said Sue, leaning her worn face down to the pillow, “think of me, if you won’t think of yourself. What would I do?”But Johnsy did not answer. The lonesomest thing in all the world is a soul when it is making ready to go on its mysterious, far journey. The fancy seemed to possess her more strongly as one by one the ties that bound her to friendship and to earth were loosed.The day wore away, and even through the twilight they could see the lone ivy leaf clinging to its stem against the wall. And then, with the coming of the night the north wind was again loosed, while the rain still beat against the windows and pattered down from the low Dutch eaves.When it was light enough Johnsy, the merciless, commanded that the shade be raised.The ivy leaf was still there.Johnsy lay for a long time looking at it. And then she called to Sue, who was stirring her chicken broth over the gas stove.“I’ve been a bad girl, Sudie,” said Johnsy. “Something has made that last leaf stay there to show me how wicked I was. It is a sin to want to die. You may bring me a little broth now, and some milk with a little port in it, and—no; bring me a hand-mirror first, and then pack some pillows about me, and I will sit up and watch you cook.”An hour later she said:“Sudie, some day I hope to paint the Bay of Naples.”The doctor came in the afternoon, and Sue had an excuse to go into the hallway as he left.“Even chances,” said the doctor, taking Sue’s thin, shaking hand in his. “With good nursing you’ll win. And now I must see another case I have downstairs. Behrman, his name is—some kind of an artist, I believe. Pneumonia, too. He is an old, weak man, and the attack is acute. There is no hope for him; but he goes to the hospital to-day to be made more comfortable.”The next day the doctor said to Sue: “She’s out of danger. You’ve won. Nutrition and care now—that’s all.”And that afternoon Sue came to the bed where Johnsy lay, contentedly knitting a very blue and very useless woolen shoulder scarf, and put one arm around her, pillows and all.“I have something to tell you, white mouse,” she said. “Mr. Behrman died of pneumonia to-day in the hospital. He was ill only two days. The janitor found him on the morning of the first day in his room downstairs helpless with pain. His shoes and clothing were wet through and icy cold. They couldn’t imagine where he had been on such a dreadful night. And then they found a lantern, still lighted, and a ladder that had been dragged from its place, and some scattered brushes, and a palette with green and yellow colors mixed on it, and—look out the window, dear, at the last ivy leaf on the wall. Didn’t you wonder why it never fluttered or moved when the wind blew? Ah, darling, it’s Behrman’s masterpiece—he painted it there the night that the last leaf fell.”Story by–O Henry.

Merchant of Venice – a tragedy or a comedy

One of the Shakespeare’s most powerful, strange, uncomfortable plays. A play about a piece of paper with a promise, a dangerous promise, and yet its a comedy. Sometimes showcasing the relation between Jews and Christians, sometimes, comedy and tragedy, and sometimes between those who are at center and the margins. Yet, it is a play that engages with toxic materials, with the major themes of self interest, the divine quality of mercy, hatred as a cyclical phenomenon.

Though, the play begins with a comic, but not entirely lighthearted way with a group of friends – male friends. But as the play proceeds, through act two, the story turns to unfold, and it is out of the history of hatred and suspicion that the play withstands in a new way. And turns into a tragic event. In act three is a famous moment, where the speech of Shylock (one of the tragic figures of the play) is a declaration of shared humanity. This speech makes the extremely strong claim of the opposite, that we share the same being. But it is also worth remembering that the speech ends with a declaration of determination to revenge.

This is a play that says if you treat me this way, I will want to get my revenge. And I have learned that also from you, because when you are treated badly you want revenge.

This play stages rage on the part of the persecuted minority. The determination on the part of Shylock to kill his enemy.

Going all the way through the act four, we,as an audience,experience that it might turn out to be one of the tragic plays, as is clear from the trial scene, ending up with Antonio’s death. But, lastly ends up with a happily -ever- after mood. In act five, everyone marrying their loved ones, changing of lives.

Genre –

There are two ways that people tend to think about comedy, a more romantic idea and a more satiric idea. And the romance is what throws the emphasis on the reconciliation.

When the play begins, fulfilling the audience’s expectations of what a comedy might look like, we have young men bantering with each other, teasing Antonio about the fact that he is sad. We also have the introduction of marriage plot, we learn that Bassanio wants to woo Portia. Also, Portia wants to find an acceptable husband. The play also goes towards a romantic play, a myths, fairy tales, romance stories that audiences might be familiar with, like involving the casket test. Audience might have reacted with some surprise when we hear this tragic news that Antonio has defaulted, that his life is in danger.

Thus, this is a play that leaves the audiences awestruck with its continuously changing moods, starting rightly from a comic pace, to going through some tragic moments, and finally ending up with a rom-com arena. Which is why most of the playwrights often misconceptualise it and try to mould it in a way which suits their audiences the most.

CHITRA, WHY DID YOU PAY MY HOTEL BILL? 🥰

The ticket collector came in and started checking people’s tickets. Suddenly, he looked in my direction and asked, ‘What about your ticket?”Not you, madam, the girl hiding below your berth. Hey, come out, where is your ticket?’ Someone was sitting below my berth. When the collector yelled at her, the girl came out of hiding.She was thin, dark, scared and looked like she had been crying profusely. She must have been about 13 or 14 years old. She had uncombed hair and was dressed in a torn skirt and blouse. She was trembling and folded both her hands. The collector started forcibly pulling her out from the compartment. Suddenly, I had a strange feeling. I stood up and called out to the collector. ‘Sir, I will pay for her ticket,’ I said.Then he looked at me and said, ‘Madam, if you give her ten rupees, she will be much happier with that than with the ticket.’I did not listen to him. I told the collector to give me a ticket to the last destination, Bangalore, so that the girl could get down wherever she wanted.Slowly, she started talking. She told me that her name was Chitra. She lived in a village near Bidar. Her father was a coolie and she had lost her mother at birth. Her father had remarried and had two sons with her stepmother. But a few months ago, her father died. Her stepmother started beating her often and did not give her food. She did not have anybody to support her so she left home in search of something better.By this time, the train had reached Bangalore. I said goodbye to Chitra and got down from the train. My driver came and picked up my bags. I felt someone watching me. When I turned back, Chitra was standing there and looking at me with sad eyes. But there was nothing more that I could do. I had paid her ticket out of compassion but I had never thought that she was going to be my responsibility!I told her to get into my car. My driver looked at the girl curiously. I told him to take us to my friend Ram’s place. Ram ran separate shelter homes for boys and girls. We at the Infosys Foundation supported him financially. I thought Chitra could stay there for some time and then we could talk about her future.Ram suggested that Chitra could go to a high school nearby. I said that I would sponsor her expenses. I left the shelter knowing that Chitra had found a home and a new direction in her life.I always enquired about Chitra’s well-being over the phone. She was studying well and her progress was good.. I offered to sponsor her college studies if she wanted to continue studying. But she said, ‘No, Akka. I have talked to my friends and made up my mind. I would do my diploma in computer science so that I can immediately get a job after 3 years.’ She wanted to become economically independent as soon as possible. Chitra obtained her diploma & got a job in a software company as an assistant testing engineer. When she got her first salary, she came to my office with a sari and a box of sweets.One day, I got a call from Chitra. She was very happy. ‘Akka, my company is sending me to USA! I wanted to meet you and take your blessings but you are not here in Bangalore.’Years passed. Occasionally, I received an e-mail from Chitra. She was doing very well in her career. She was posted across several cities in USA and was enjoying life. I silently prayed that she should always be happy wherever she was.Years later, I was invited to deliver a lecture in San Francisco for Kannada Koota, an organization where families who speak Kannada meet and organize events. The lecture was in a convention hall of a hotel and I decided to stay at the same hotel. After the lecture, I was planning to leave for the airport. When I checked out of the hotel room and went to the reception counter to pay the bill, the receptionist said, ‘Ma’am, you don’t need to pay us anything. The lady over there has already settled your bill. She must know you pretty well.’ I turned around and found Chitra there.She was standing with a young white man and wore a beautiful sari. She was looking very pretty with short hair. Her dark eyes were beaming with happiness and pride. As soon as she saw me, she gave me a brilliant smile, hugged me and touched my feet. I was overwhelmed with joy and did not know what to say. I was very happy to see the way things had turned out for Chitra. But I came back to my original question. ‘Chitra, why did you pay my hotel bill? That is not right.’ Suddenly sobbing, she hugged me and said, ‘Because you paid for my ticket from Bombay to Bangalore!'(Excerpted from Mrs. Sudha Murty’s ‘The Day I Stopped Drinking Milk’ )

Mothers Day poetry

I walked into my garden

The soil appeared to be scraps of papers sewn together disproportionately,

Rain came in like delayed parcels

I noticed the rose, dripping water off it’s petals

drop by drop and then it all— like your love

The sky descended down to me,

Solid as a glass, blue as a sea

I wiped off the clouds,

and looked at heaven,

And oh, it looked like you.

-ekanika shah

Reach out to me on instagram @ekanika_shah

The invisible men🕴

The stranger came early in February, one wintry day, through a biting wind and a driving snow, the last snowfall of the year, over the down, walking as it seemed from Bramblehurst railway station, and carrying a little black portmanteau in his thickly gloved hand. He was wrapped up from head to foot, and the brim of his soft felt hat hid every inch of his face but the shiny tip of his nose; the snow had piled itself against his shoulders and chest, and added a white crest to the burden he carried. He staggered into the Coarch and Horses, more dead than alive as it seemed, and flung his portmanteau down. “A fire,” he cried, “in the name of human charity! A room and a fire!” He stamped and shook the snow from off himself in the bar, and followed Mrs. Hall into her guest parlour to strike his bargain. And with that much introduction, that and a ready acquiescence to terms and a couple of sovereigns flung upon the table, he took up his quarters in the inn.Mrs. Hall lit the fire and left him there while she went to prepare him a meal with her own hands. A guest to stop at Iping in the wintertime was an unheard-of piece of luck, let alone a guest who was no “haggler,” and she was resolved to show herself worthy of her good fortune. As soon as the bacon was well under way, and Millie, her lymphatic aid, had been been brisked up a bit by a few deftly chosen expressions of contempt, she carried the cloth, plates, and glasses into the parlour and began to lay them with the utmost éclat. Although the fire was burning up briskly, she was surprised to see that her visitor still wore his hat and coat, standing with his back to her and staring out of the window at the falling snow in the yard. His gloved hands were clasped behind him, and he seemed to be lost in thought. She noticed that the melted snow that still sprinkled his shoulders dripped upon her carpet. “Can I take your hat and coat, sir,” she said, “and give them a good dry in the kitchen?””No,” he said without turning.She was not sure she had heard him, and was about to repeat her question.He turned his head and looked at her over his shoulder. “I prefer to keep them on,” he said with emphasis, and she noticed that he wore big blue spectacles with side-lights, and had a bushy side-whisker over his coatcollar that completely hid his cheeks and face.”Very well, sir,” she said. “As you like. In a bit the room will be warmer.”He made no answer, and had turned his face away from her again, and Mrs. Hall, feeling that her conversational advances were ill-timed, laid the rest of the table things in a quick staccato and whisked out of the room. When she returned he was still standing there, like a man of stone, his back hunched, his collar turned up, his dripping hat-brim turned down, hiding his face and ears completely. She put down the eggs and bacon with considerable emphasis, and called rather than said to him, “Your lunch is served, sir.””Thank you.” he said at the same time, and did not stir until she was closing the door. Then he swung round and approached the table with a certain eager quickness.As she went behind the bar to the kitchen she heard a sound repeated at regular intervals. Chirk, chirk, chirk, it went, the sound of a spoon being rapidly whisked round a basin. “That girl!” she said. “There! I clean forgot it. It’s her being so long!” And while she herself finished mixing the mustard, she gave Millie a few verbal stabs for her excessive slowness. She had cooked the ham and eggs, laid the table, and done everything, while Millie (help indeed!) had only succeeded in delaying the mustard. And him a new guest and wanting to stay! Then she filled the mustard pot, and, putting it with a certain stateliness upon a gold and black tea-tray, carried it into the parlour.She rapped and entered promptly. As she did so her visitor moved quickly, so that she got but a glimpse of a white object disappearing behind the table. It would seem he was picking something from the floor. She rapped down the mustard pot on the table, and then she noticed the overcoat and hat had been taken off and put over a chair in front of the fire, and a pair of wet boots threatened rust to her steel fender. She went to these things resolutely. “I suppose I may have them to dry now,” she said in a voice that brooked no denial.”Leave the hat,” said her visitor, in a muffled voice, and turning she saw he had raised his head and was sitting and looking at her.For a moment she stook gaping at him, too surprised to speak.He held a white cloth—it was a serviette he had brought with him—over the lower part of his face, so that his mouth and jaws were completely hidden, and that was the reason for his muffled voice. But it was not that which startled Mrs. Hall, It was the fact that all his forehead above his blue glasses was covered by a white bandage, and that another covered his ears, leaving not a scrap of his face exposed excepting only his pink, peaked nose. It was bright, pink, and shiny just as it had been at first. He wore a dark-brown velvet jacket with a high, black, linen-lined collar turned up about his neck. The thick black hair, escaping as it could below and between the cross bandages, projected in curious tails and horns, giving him the strangest appearance conceivable. This muffled and bandaged head was so unlike what she had anticipated, that for a moment she was rigid.He did not remove the serviette, but remained holding it, as she saw now, with a brown gloved hand, and regarding her with his inscrutable blue glasses. “Leave the hat,” he said, speaking very distinctly through the white cloth.Her nerves began to recover from the shock they had received. She placed the hat on the chair again by the fire. “I didn’t know, sir,” she began, “that—” and she stopped embarrassed.”Thank you,” he said dryily, glancing from her to the door and then at her again.”I’ll have them nicely dried, sir, at once,” she said, and carried his clothes out of the room. She glanced at his white-swathed head and blue goggles again as she was going out the door; but his napkin was still in front of his face. She shivered a little as she closed the door behind her, and her face was eloquent of her surprise and perplexity. “I never,” she whispered. “There!” She went quite softly to the kitchen, and was too preoccupied to ask Millie what she was messing about with now, when she got there.The visitor sat and listened to her retreating feet. He glanced inquiringly at the window before he removed his serviette, and resumed his meal. He took a mouthful, glanced suspiciously at the window, took another mouthful, then rose and, taking the serviette in his hand, walked across the room and pulled the blind down to the top of the white muslin that obscured the lower panes. This left the room in a twilight. This done, he returned with an easier air to the table and his meal.”The poor soul’s had an accident or an operation or something,” said Mrs. Hall. “What a turn them bandages did give me, to be sure!”She put on some more coal, unfolded the clothes-horse, and extended the traveller’s coat upon this. “And they goggles! Why, he looked more like a divin’-helmet than a human man!” She hung his muffler on a corner of the horse. “And holding that handkercher over his mouth all the time. Talkin’ through it! . . . Perhaps his mouth was hurt too—maybe.” She turned round, as one who suddenly remembers. “Bless my soul alive!” she said, going off at a tangent; “ain’t you done them taters yet, Millie?”When Mrs. Hall went to clear away the stranger’s lunch, her idea that his mouth must also have been cut or disfigured in the accident she supposed him to have suffered, was confirmed, for he was smoking a pipe, and all the time that she was in the room he never loosened the silk muffler he had wrapped round the lower part of his face to put the mouthpiece to his lips. Yet it was not forgetfulness, for she saw he glanced at it as it smouldered out. He sat in the corner with his back to the window-blind and spoke now, having eaten and drunk and been comfortably warmed through, with less aggressive brevity than before. The reflection of the fire lent a kind of red animation to his big spectacles they had lacked hitherto.”I have some luggage,” he said, “at Bramblehurst station,” and he asked her how he could have it sent. He bowed his bandaged head quite politely in acknowledgement of her explanation. “To-morrow!” he said. “There is no speedier delivery?” and seemed quite disappointed when she answered, “No.” Was she quite sure? No man with a trap who would go over?Mrs. Hall, nothing loath, answered his questions and developed a conversation. “It’s a steep road by the down, sir,” she said in answer to the question about a trap; and then, snatching at an opening, said, “It was there a carriage was up-settled, a year ago and more, A gentleman killed, besides his coachman. Accidents, sir, happens in a moment, don’t they?”But the visitor was not to be drawn so easily. “They do,” he said through his muffler, eyeing her quietly through his impenetrable glasses.”But they take long enough to get well, sir, Don’t they? . . . There was my sister’s son, Tom, jest cut his arm with a scythe, Tumbled on it in the ‘ayfield, and, bless me! he was three months tied up, sir. you’d hardly believe it. It’s regular given me a dread of a scythe, sir.””I can quite understand that,” said the visitor.”He was afraid, one time, that he’d have to have an op’ration—he was that bad, sir.”The visitor laughed abruptly, a bark of a laugh that he seemed to bite and kill in his mouth. “Was he?” he said.”He was, sir. And no laughing matter to them as had the doing for him, as I had—my sister being took up with her little ones so much. There was bandages to do, sir, and bandages to undo. So that if I may make so bold as to say it, sir—””Will you get me some matches?” said the visitor, quite abruptly. “My pipe is out.”Mrs. Hall was pulled up suddenly. It was certainly rude of him, after telling him all she had done. She gasped at him for a moment, and remembered the two sovereigns. She went for the matches.”Thanks,” he said concisely, as she put them down, and turned his shoulder upon her and stared out of the window again. It was altogether too discouraging. Evidently he was sensitive on the topic of operations and bandages. She did not “make so bold as to say,” however, after all. But his snubbing way had irritated her, and Millie had a hot time of it that afternoon.The visitor remained in the parlour until four o’clock, without giving the ghost of an excuse for an intrusion. For the most part he was quite still during that time; it would seem he sat in the growing darkness smoking in the firelight, perhaps dozing.Once or twice a curious listener might have heard him at the coals, and for the space of five minutes he was audible pacing the room. He seemed to be talking to himself. Then the armchair creaked as he sat down again.Story by—H. G. Wells

Paving the path towards practicing Self Love

Alright so here I will be sharing some of my thoughts on how to take those initial steps to embark upon this beautiful journey of practicing self love and compassion on a daily basis.

1)  LET GO OF EXPECTATIONS
I know this can be tricky and quite hard for most of us because everything that we do has the desire of a certain outcome attached to it and if the outcome is not as expected, disappointments follow which lead to anxiety, it anger and the list of the negative feelings just go overboard. Instead you can have standards you like setting standards is what I allow in my life and what I don’t but don’t expect anything from anyone and from life in general. Try to go with the flow and you will soon start accepting the way you are and the way everyone else is and it being so much of peace, trust me. Just do your job letting go of the desire of the fruit- preached the greatest Lord Krishna in Bhagwad Gita.

2) DON’T TOLERATE ANYBODY’S UNNECESSARY SHIT
Now what I actually mean by it is that you are not supposed to bear with anybody projecting their hatred and frustration upon you especially if there are a closed one and if they matter but this just goes out of context if they are just random people on social media or those people whom you don’t considered to be friends. If they talk ill, let them, because their words define them and not who you are. But, on the other hand, if somebody close is treating you badly then you are not supposed to sit quietly and accept it. Rather communicate and gently do that because you don’t want to spoil the relationship, remind yourself that you want to mend the things and yeah thats how it goes. Because your comfort and level of peace has to be your highest priority. And and and, consI just read in a book, sorry can’t recall the name as of now, maybe “Codependent No More”. It said that you only tolerate the level of shit to the extent from others to which you make yourself go through. So be gentle and kind to your own self because if you don’t say anything bad about yourself then you won’t take it from others as well.

3) SETTING AND ENFORCING BOUNDARIES
Now this is again a tricky one. Boundaries are often created by us to protect our inner energy and tranquility. As we all know that we are human beings and we can have bad days too. It’s completely normal. So on those days, we might even act quite cold with our loved ones who genuinely care for us so we should the try and communicate with them that we are not in a position to talk rather than just venting out on them. Also, know that it is completely justified to ignore calls, not answer to texts, not be available for every hangout etc if you don’t feel like. You have to protect your little heart and its wishes but not by being rude and non-compassionate and that’s how self love functions.

This article is inspired by The Self Love Fix podcast on Google, make sure that you give it a try.

Dealing with jealousy

Oh well! So that’s quite a juicy topic and a very interesting one which is I feel is more of a hush-hush topic, for people know that it exists but they don’t want to admit it publicly, considering it might cause them some sort of an embarrassment or is going to tease their ego a bit and that’s the reason why they are busy silently combating with this one but here I am going to talk about it in a more umm, deeper manner or whatever you may call it.

I am pretty sure that all of us must have experienced jealousy at one stage or the other no matter how much we try to get away with it but I think walking through jealousy is only going to be a successful conquest if, we firstly accept and acknowledge that we have been at points, jealous in our life post which almost 70% of the job is already done. It’s absolutely normal, just a part of human mindset but is deeply rooted in fear and in lack and know that, the feeling of lack is rooted in ego.

Sometimes it is important for us to deeply analyse our emotions and go an extra mile to try and heal them cause unless we heal them, they are going to keep causing troubles for us, leading to absence of mental peace. So why not go into deeper insights and try and figure out how jealousy looks like. It is the general idea that can be taken from the help of sentences that people generally use;  I hate that she has those things, Why does she have them? I wish I had them. Why is he with her? I think I look much better than that girl. Look at me, my Life. I don’t have all these things. I don’t have this money. I don’t have a boyfriend. I don’t have xyz and the list would go on and on unless we choose to accept it and embrace ourselves and practice more and more self love and compassion. Might sound difficult at first, but is not impossible.

If somebody has something, we need to regard it as a blessing bestowed upon them. For the enormous amounts of hard work that they must have been upto all those years of their life, somewhat like the quote “Work hard in Silence and let your success make the noise”. We don’t know, we aren’t aware how incredibly hard circusmstances they would have endured, how many failures they had to overcome and when the time has come for them to enjoy the reward, the fruit of long years of toiling hard and struggles, what are we doing to them? Are we really being compassionate here? Are we really wishing them luck and positivity. Are we really being good human beings here?No, by being jealous and envious, we arez on top of it, trying to tarnish their success by throwing away negativity and jealousy is a negative vibe. Let’s accept it.

So try and make a smooth transition from jealousy to being inspired by that someone, to that extent, where you also want to work hard to earn that fruit and for that, know that, you would also have to put in the equal amount of hardwork, absorb in the pressure and only then you will be rewarded because if you want to chill in an air conditioned room, you would first have to know the experience of being burnt under the sun. Because, my dear, nothing in this world is ever free of cost. You have to endure some amount of “pain” in order to get some “gain” and notice that when you channelize your entire energy towards this process of trying to gain something, trying to work work hard and fulfill your dreams & desire post setting up goals and following your passion, you would find yourself engulfed in a bubble of positivity and there would just be no room for negativity and even if there are some other things which make you feel low and jealous and if the self doubt tends to creep in, don’t worry. Just soothe your inner child, comfort it and with a tranquil state of mind, affirm and say that I have been working hard and I am sure if I don’t give up right now, I will also get what I truly deserve. Also, be mindful enough to not say that “I will also get to match up with that someone”. That’s where comparison comes into play and this is what leads to jealousy. So remember, that as long as you hold love and compassion in your heart, nothing negative can impact you. I hope it helped.

(3) 15 Date Ideas That You Can Do At Home

As promised, the final part of the #LockdownDating series is here. Hope you all have a fun time reading.

11) A NETFLIX DATE
Go on binge on your favourite series together with your loved one by your side and enjoy it to the fullest. Keep the romance rekindling with feeding each other popcorns loaded with extra cheese. Whatta cheesy date, right? But trust me, does wonders!

12) ‎A RECREATING THE WEDDING DAY DATE
If you are a married couple then you must be having the dresses that you wore on your big day for the nuptials. What’s the wait for? Get them on and re-dress as bride and groom and relive your wedding day. Because, unlike that day, you would not be so nervous and shy today but alike a confident duo out on a date. Let’s recreate the magic of the day when you two officially became ONE and for life!

13) ‎A KIDS STUDY DAY DATE
Usually it happens that one of the parents is made responsible for taking care of the child’s studies. But have you thought how interesting and fun it would be if both the parents teach their kid together. This way they would not only understand the child better but also themselves better as the parents of their little one. Family time is calling guys because as I said life is emminently about the simple joys in the company of your loved ones and very little of what is too fancy. I included this point so that your child does not feel neglected with the overflowing of romance between his parents.

14) ‎A PAINTING DATE
Grab an old T-shirt or a bed sheet and do a couple activity of painting together. Take those brushes, paints and let the colour of love unleash and unfold upon the pale fabric which is now coloured beautifully through your love. As much as you will enjoy the process, you would even cherish the outcome, the masterpiece which you would have created.

15) A SWIMMY DATE
If you have a pool in your bungalow, what’s the waiting for? Slip in your sassy skin-fitting swimsuit, wear that fancy hat and those nice sunnies. Get ready to be tanned by not only just the sun but also by the love of your life. Going skinny-dipping can be a wild move but who ever said no to it?

So I hope you got some really innovative ideas on how you can keep the spark in your relationship alive even when you can’t get access to materialistic things (very relatable with the present situation of Covid 19). You cannot gift anything to your spouse or take him/her out on expensive dates, go for exotic holidaying in lavish resorts but one thing to remember is that true love is expressed from kind gestures that the two do for each other and from within the heart conversations. All these diamond rings, flowers, foreign vacations  might bring temporary happiness but love is eternal and that is maintained through the heart’s devotion. All my best wishes and loads of love to all our readers. I pray and hope that you are all staying safe in your homes along with your loved ones. Take care.
Bub

(2) 15 Date Ideas that you can do at home

Hope you guys checked out my previous article of the #LockdownDating series where I  listed down four budget-friendly methods of  keeping the spark in your relationship alive during these times of Covid 19. Here are the other few suggestions.

5) A MOVIE DATE
Who said that you need to go to a theatre crowded with 50 other people to celebrate you and your partner’s togetherness when you can do it in the privacy of your room itself. Decorate the room with scented candles, get into your comfy pajamas, snuggle closer to your loved one and boom here goes… Watch your favourite movie or maybe a new one together in the warmth of your home & partner’s arms. Works magically for home theatres.

6) A SPORTY DATE
Backyard is for out-the-room romance. Everyone is well aware of this but have you ever experimented it practically yourself? If not then go dress up and enjoy playing some sport i.e badminton, gully cricket with your beloved partner. This won’t only keep you fit in a gym-free world right now but also rekindle that dying out flame of romance between you two.

7) A NEW HOBBY DATE
No two people are exactly similar no matter how compatible you two are. So why not try and teach other one of your favourite hobbies which your partner admires the most about you. It can be learning to play a guitar, sewing sweaters, baking cookies, lifting weights, trying entangling yoga poses or just anything. Watch how the process of being a mentor to your loved one soon turns into a moment of celebrating love.

8) A CHOP-CHOP DATE
Lockdown has kept us from visiting hair salons and I am sure you must have missed out on so many of your  appointments. So why not let your love experiment with your hair and give it a fresh, new cut? That way, you’ll free yourself off a monotonous look and also sneak in a few moments of marital bliss. Don’t forget to return this hair stylist favour to your partner too.

9) A MORNING DATE
Waking up next to the person you love the most is undoubtedly one of the most calming and grateful feelings ever. Don’t you agree too? Try planting a soft kiss on your partner’s forehead to remind him/her of how serene and blessed you feel to be with him. Go brushing together, snap some cute selfies, have breakfast together and watch your love growing unfathomably.

10) A DRESS-TO-IMPRESS DATE
By now you must have been bored in your daily wears even if they are the most comfortable pyjamas on the planet. I know you desperately want to slip into your sassy outfits that you bought long ago, wear those fancy braids, put on that awe-inspiring makeup and woo your partner just like you used to in the pre lockdown era. So what are you waiting for? Make the use of the golden opportunity when your partner is busy working from home on his laptop and get ready to dress to impress and transform a normal evening into a dazzling date.

P.S~ Stay tuned for the last and final part of this article. I am sure it is going to be an interesting one. Hope you all had a fun time reading.

“YOUR HONOR”, SONY LIV’S NEW CRIME THRILLER !

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“YOUR HONOR”, SONY LIV’S new crime thriller web show is completely worth a wholesome watch. This show has been winning hearts since the day it went on air. This web show is an Indian adaptation of Israeli original show, “Kvodo”, directed by national award winner E. Nivas. The starcast involves Jimmy Shaergil and Mita Vashisht, along with Varun Badola, Yashpal Sharma and Suhasini Mulay in pivotal roles.

This hindi web series is shot in Ludhiyana, Punjab. Director E Niwas through his vision tries to portray how a person can go extra miles and break all the principles to save his loved ones. The plot revolves around the life of an old judge Bishan Khosla (Jimmy Shergil) who not only practices law but also lives by it. Known for his unbiased and fair judgment, Bishan has earned a lot of respect in the society. But things go haywire when he and his son gets involved in a hit and run accident case. Being a dedicated father and single dad he subverts all moralities and ethics to save his son. Bishan makes every possible effort to save his son but soon finds out that victim’s father is a violent and avenging gangster. To his dismay the victims father turns out to be the same gangster who was imprisoned as a consequence of Bishan’s judgment. The story shows that even though Bishan is an honorable man, he agrees to tweak his morality when it comes to his son.

Why to watch the show?

The plot of the show is captivating one. It will keep you engrossed as to what will happen next? Which character will take a certain decision? Another thing that will make you interested is its coherent dialogues and characters with their hard-hitting scenes. Talking about Jimmy Shergil he is the powerhouse of the show and makes the character of judge completely real. Besides Jimmy, Mita Vashisht is the one who gives complete justification to her role as a police inspector. The other supporting actors have also played their part to perfection.

So this show will completely capture your feelings and nuances. It will help you know how the mind battles between right and wrong. So if you are a lover of crime thriller then do spend some time on this wonderful experience.