Tag Archives: #business

BUSINESS

It is the activity of making money by producing or buying and selling products for the sole purpose of making profit.

FORMS OF BUSINESS

  • Sole proprietorship
  • Partnership
  • Corporation
  • Cooperative
  • Limited liability partnership
  • Franchise
  • A company limited by guarantee
  • A company limited by shares
  • A company limited by guarantee with a share capital
  • A limited liability company
  • An unlimited company with or without a share capital
  • Companies formed by letters patent
  • Charter corporations
  • Statutory companies

CAPITAL

When businesses need to raise money they sometimes offer securities for sale. Capital may be raised through private means, by an initial public offering or IPO on a stock exchange, or in other ways.

CLASSIFICATIONS OF BUSINESS             

  • Agriculture
  • Financial services which  include banks, brokerage firms, credit unions, credit cards, insurance companies, asset and investment companies such as private equity firms, private equity funds, real estate investment trusts, sovereign wealth funds, pension funds, mutual funds, index funds, and hedge funds, stock exchanges, and other companies that generate profits through investment and management of capital.
  • Entertainment companies
  • Industrial manufacturers
  • Real estate
  • Retailers, wholesalers, and distributors act as middlemen and get goods produced by manufacturers
  • Transportation business
  • Sports
  • Utilities produce public services such as water, electricity, waste management or sewage treatment.
  • Service businesses

ACTIVITIES IN A BUSINESS

  • Accounting
  • Finance
  • Manufacturing
  • Marketing
  • Research and development
  • Safety
  • Sales

TRADE UNION (LABOUR UNION)

A trade union  is an organization of workers who have come together to achieve common goals such as protecting the integrity of its trade, improving safety standards, achieving higher pay and benefits such as health care and retirement, increasing the number of employees an employer assigns to complete the work, and better working conditions. The trade union, through its leadership, bargains with the employer on behalf of union members and negotiates labor contracts with employers. The most common purpose of these associations or unions is “maintaining or improving the conditions of their employment”. This may include the negotiation of wages, work rules, complaint procedures, rules governing hiring, firing, and promotion of workers, benefits, workplace safety and policies.

COMMERCIAL LAW

A very detailed and well-established body of rules that evolved over a very long period of time applies to commercial transactions. The need to regulate trade and commerce and resolve business disputes helped shape the creation of law and courts.

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

Businesses often have important “intellectual property” that needs protection from competitors for the company to stay profitable. This could require patents, copyrights, trademarks, or preservation of trade secrets. Most businesses have names, logos, and similar branding techniques that could benefit from trademarking.

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Business and Management are the disciplines devoted to organizing, analyzing, and planning various types of business operations.

Fields of business management include-:

  • Advertising
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Hospitality Management
  • Information Systems Management
  • International Business
  • Nonprofit Management
  • Operations Management
  • Public Administration
  • Sales Management
  • Supply Chain Management

Business and Management is feeling the impact of technological advances and changes. With big data and artificial intelligence allowing many tasks to be automated, the nature of business is changing every day.

FORCE MAJEURE EFFECTS ON THE BUSINESS

HOW WILL FORCE MAJEURE EFFECT THE BUSINESSES ALL AROUND THE WORLD DURING COVID-19 ?

Force majeure refers to a contractual provision that limits liability due to unforeseen events outside the control of the parties that delay performance of the contract or prevent performance entirely. A force majeure provision excuses performance based upon the occurrence of specific qualifying events that constitute force majeure or that fall within the purview of a broader “catch-all” category of events that may qualify as force majeure events. These may include “acts of God,” war, fire, national emergencies, labor strikes, diseases, pandemics, epidemics, natural disasters, governmental acts or regulations, and other “acts beyond the control” of the parties.

In light of the novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, many businesses are confronting circumstances that may excuse or delay their obligations to perform under existing contracts due to the occurrence of a force majeure event. Governments and businesses have implemented measures to prevent or curtail the spread of the virus in the form of travel bans, border closures, restrictions on gathering sizes, closure of non-essential stores and businesses, cancelation of public events and other similar measures. The current and evolving restrictions designed to prevent the spread of COVID-19 may make it impossible to timely perform under the contract. Consequently, many businesses are simply unable to perform their contractual obligations. Some have invoked force majeure to eliminate or limit liability due to their inability to perform such contractual obligations. Similarly, some companies have cancelled various contracts for goods and services in light of travel restrictions and other limitations. The extent to which COVID-19 and its downstream effects and consequences constitute a qualifying force majeure event is highly fact-specific and depends on the terms of the contract, the specific facts, governing law and how courts in the relevant jurisdictions interpret force majeure provisions, among other things. With no force majeure clause it will be more difficult to claim relief. This means that the person who cannot fulfill the contract could be in breach of contract. If the contract has no force majeure clause then frustration may apply.  Even if a contract does not have a specific force majeure provision, applicable law may allow a party to excuse performance under other theories in the face of unexpected events.

COVID-19 does not itself usually stop a contract being fulfilled. It is the consequences of COVID-19 which causes problems. For many contracts entered into before January 2020 then COVID-19 issues could not have been anticipated. But it would be more difficult to claim that COVID-19 issues could not have been anticipated for a contract entered into mid-March 2020. This is important as if COVID-19 issues could reasonably have been anticipated, then relief for force majeure is probably not available. Although COVID-19 is almost certainly for most contracts an event outside the reasonable control of a party that is not enough. COVID-19 itself will probably not hinder performance; it is the consequences that matter. A government decree which is legally binding ordering a factory shut is almost certainly for a pre-2020 contract an event outside the reasonable control of the parties.

INDIA’S MASSIVE TRADE DEFICIT WITH CHINA; LOWEST IN FIVE YEARS

India’s trade deficit with China sinks to $48.66 billion in 2019-2020 which is lowest in five years. Now what is the trade deficit? Trade deficit can be defined as an amount of imports of a particular country exceeding the amount of its exports. According to the data, exports to China in the last financial year stood at $16.6 billion, while imports accumulated at $65.26 billion. India and China are two very well-known countries with ancientCivilizations, their partnership in every major field like trades has made an ideal example since over 2000 years. But from the last few weeks the India- China relation has deteriorated. The main cause of the clash was a dispute over the sovereignty of the widely separated Aksai Chin and Arunachal Pradesh border regions. So, it can be assumed that this clash played a vital role along with lower imports and higher exports as the major cause of India’s significant reduction of trade deficit.

The major imports from China cover electronic gadgets (clocks, watches, smart phones, calculator, laptop etc.) plastic materials (toys, plastic containers, bottles), sports goods, musical instruments, furniture, chemicals, irons, mineral source, metals and fertilizers.

Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) from China in India fell to $163.78 billion in 2019-2020 from $229 billion in previous monetary, the data said. 14% India’s imports are recorded by China and the major portion comes from critical pharma ingredients and telecom.

 India was able to captivate FDI worth $2.38 billion from 2000 to March 2020 but in April the government has narrowed the standards for FDI coming from the neighboring countries especially which share a land border with India like China.  As per FDI, any company or individual can steep in any field with the government approval.

Top sectors like metallurgical (USD 199.28 million), services (USD 170.18 million), electrical equipment (USD 185.33 million) which showed maximum FDI from China in the period of April 2000- March 2020.

Around 371 products have been identified for technical regulations. Out of 371, technical regulations have been assigned for 150 products worth $47 billion of imports.

The reduced imports from China also helped the U.S. extend its lead as India’s largest training partner against trade off $88.8 billion with US India straight with China was just $82 billion. 2019-2020 year’s trade deficit of India is almost similar to 2014-15, when the Narendra Modi took first post, but it was 34% higher than 2013-14, stimulating the government to suggest that the further steps taken in recent months have yielded results.

In that definite time when entire world has been put off financially due Corona virus pandemic accompaniedby India-China war; in the standing of that point taking such steps like restricting the imports from China would be a great decision for India.

The Country and countrymen both are hopeful, at the same, of time what lies ahead in future.

“A large chunk of these originate from China. We will pursue import substitution,” a senior official said.

BIGGEST MANUFACTURER OF WORLD: CHINA

Whenever we go to the market and if we observe more than 50% of products have label and tags on which it is written: “MADE IN CHINA”. Due to which many buyer and seller might wonder ‘though china is a communist country’ still it is the world’s biggest manufacturer. Many of the product of china is similar to the US and other countries still most of the people buy Chinese product because of its lower price.

During the time famine which was faced by the Chinese in 1958-1961, they lost their economy and crisis took place at that time but as the time passes they rebuild themselves and today they are Biggest Manufacturer of the world

China is known to be “the world’s factory” because of the following reasons:

  • Low wages

During late 20 century, people were divided into 2 category urban and rural but as time changes they started internal migration many rural people came to the urban city for the work as we all know China is the most populated country in the world that’s why the supply of worker is more for working on low wages then the demand of worker this help china in production of goods as if the wages will be low then price of the product will be low.

Also, they don’t believe in the law of child labour but this law seems to be changing and also they have increased their minimum wages.

According to 2020 report, minimum hours cost in shanghai is 22 Yuan which is $3.16 her and if we consider of the month then it is 2480 Yuan which is around $355 and on the other hand in Shenzhen, the monthly wages is 2200 Yuan which is $315 and hourly it is considered as 20.3 Yuan ($2.91). Since the wages are low therefore the price of product decrease

And if we talk about the western country their main focus is on minimum wage value and child labour. This makes a difference in the price of the same kind of product.

  • LOWER COMPLIANCE

In certain countries mainly western are very strict and concern about their rules and guidelines regarding child labour, minimum wage rates, labour laws etc. but at the same time if we talk about china they don’t have any such strict rule regarding child labour or worker’s laws most of the industries don’t follow any such rules.

Child labour in industries of china has long shifted and also they are not provided with any compensation insurance not only this many companies follow the policy to pay wages once a year to the workers. This is the way to keep the workers form quitting before the year ends.

Nowadays workers are standing for their rights and government are now quite concerned about workers rights however, slowly and gradually these laws are taking place in industries regarding child labour, environmental protection and minimum wages.

  • BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT

China is involved in trading from many years during AD 1371-1433 china exchange goods; culture and religion with other countries like South Asia and the Middle East through the silk route

After that, as time passes on of the most famous person from Ming Dynasty called captain Zheng took 7 trips to establish trading contact with countries like- Africa, India, Arabia and South East Asia through the Sea route. So, it is quite clear from this that China has a large history of trading with other countries and for this, they need network supplier, customer, component manufacturer, distributor, government agencies. This is good for the business and china has all such link which helps them to grow their work worldwide.

  • TAX AND DUTIES

In 1985 china came up the policy to rebate the export tax and also they abolish the system of double tax on export goods which means zero% of VAT (value-added tax) which means they enjoyed the rebate policy and VAT exemption also this help to lower down the price of their goods this policy also attract the investor and companies produce low-cost goods.

  • CURRENCY

Most of the time China is a summons for artificially depreciating the value of Yuan which provide them to export similar kinds of goods produced by their competitor country U.S.

China always takes care of rising in Yuan they buy the dollar and sell Yuan.

In late 2005 according to one report, the value of Yuan was 30% against the dollar after that in 2017 the value raises to 8% against the dollar

Although in 2018 trend got to change and Yuan got depreciate against Dollar, in the beginning, the US adds the tariffs to china goods but then on 8th August 2019 central bank of china lower the Yuan to 7.0205 per Dollar this allow china to export their good with a lower price of the product but also this results in Trade war between China and US.

  • CONCLUSION

With the help of cheap labour and less compliance and business environment help china to become “largest manufacturer of the world” but also at the same time artificially depreciating the value of Yuan result in a trade war between both US and China because of the lower price we able to see most of the product in the market with the label ‘Made In China.’

Why angel investors prefer Tech start-ups over Non-Tech?

Start-ups (which indirectly fall under MSEs category of taxation) since 2014 have collected around $100 billion and are on the ever-accelerating way to mark its way to $500 billion by 2025, with a projection to create over 35 – 40 lakh jobs. 

It was a beautiful day for Mr. Singh. He had invested in an idea introduced by a bunch of boys who had recently graduated out of an Engineering College. It was something related to irrigation technology with the name “Ivy-Irri Tech”. Mr. Singh had no idea what it was, but his financial advisor and accountant advised him that the investment would garner good profit in a very short period of time. After he found everything to be appropriate, he wrote off a check for Rs 3 crore for 3,000 shares to Ivy-Irri Tech boys. Today, he received the triple of his investment (i.e., Rs 9 crore) as the start-up was brought under the banner of a multinational corporation (MNC).

Mr. Singh was indeed an ‘angel’ who invested in the start-up seeing the growth projection as calculated by the discounted cash flow (DCF) method. He knew and took all the risks on the idea. Like Mr. Singh, there are a number of high-value individuals in our nation who are approached to invest in a small idea, which the ones presenting are able to convince (or show) to be of big worth in a short period of time.

A few days went by and the boys again contacted him over the notice they received from the Income Tax Dept. The notice stated that they had to pay 30% as ‘Angel Tax’ clause of Section 56(2)(vii b) of the Income Tax Act, 1961.

These start-ups operate in a very vulnerable environment and anything can happen any moment. All the money made in the first half of the day may just vanish off by second. The basic principle of start-ups is a low investment to high yield, in less time.

According to Economic Times, “Angel tax is a term used to refer to the income tax payable on capital raised by unlisted companies via the issue of shares where the share price is seen in excess of the fair market value of the shares sold. The excess realisation is treated as income and taxed accordingly.” This is charged when the initial “angel” investor is an Indian, while foreigners are exempted from it as that’d just add more to Foreign Direct Investments (FDI) category. Also, the value of start-ups is counted against the industry suggested method of DCF with the net value present (NVP) method that increases the difference between the projected margins to the excess premium earned.

Hence, nowthe start-up will have to pay the excess of what they received of initial capital (i.e., Rs 3 crore).  In shares & dividend terms – Mr. Singh bought 3000 @ Rs 10000 each. He sold them (the startup sold it to the MNC) at a premium (excess from Market Value – profit) of Rs 30,000 for each share. Hence, for 3000 shares the excess profit is Rs 6 crore. Now 30% of Rs 6 crore is Rs 1.80 crore and that is what the start-up is charged as “Angel Tax”.

This is a major de-motivation to the hardworking, innovative minds that have worked hard to put up the efforts to bring their dream into happening, just like the “Ivy-Irri Tech” chaps and returned the initial investment in a triple in less than some years, but now are a victim of the ‘Angel Tax’.

However, the income tax regimes in our nation, which are duly unregulated at the helm of dysfunctional bureaucracy and call for immediate reforms at a great extent, do not spare even the ‘angels’. This taxation regime has led to the inclination of angel investors into investing in tech start-ups and deviating from the non-tech cohorts. The falling of start-ups into MSEs category, the very narrow definition of start-ups, and the bureaucracy which looks for an opportunity to put to their advantage, are the reasons for non-tech start-ups being not worth investment against hassles.

Of the limited few exemptions in Angel Tax, the angel investors tend to avoid the non-tech sector as there’s a very obstructive measure which restricts the investment into immovable objects. So if the start-up in non-tech sectors, would involve investment in immovable assets (which is the case in most non-tech start-ups) then the investment would not fall into exemption into start-up’s seed funding and thereby incurring additional taxation. The ruling Govt. has presented a very ambitious plan to lead India to a $5 trillion economy for which there needs to be a safe growth rate in the economy at 11.3% (also assuming rupee falls to the dollar, further) for the next five years with no exception contrary to the present which is less than 4%. Further, with Moody’s downgrading India to ‘Baa3’ category, just one rank above “junk” category, the onset of FDIs flowing into Indian start-ups seems reclusive and does not seem to recover anytime soon. So, the Income Tax Act, 1961 needs to reform from its very core to match up the economic challenges of the 21st century for Indian investors to keep the market afloat and its operations flared up. Time is money, and neither of that we do have. 

FAILURE IN THE START-UPS

India is struggling for becoming third largest startup ecosystem in the world for which it has provided the ground for many new startups in last few years still 90% of startup fails within 5 years, the main reason behind this failure is lack of uniqueness and also 98 out 100 young entrepreneurs copy the western ideas they have lack of information and knowledge about new technical innovative ideas for their business.

According to the study of IBM institute of business value (IBV) conduct the survey in collaboration with Oxford Economics to know about India startup ecosystem and the main reason behind the failures in Startups is lack of innovation, non-availability of skilled workforce and insufficient funding. As India is giving a chance to many new startups and a young businessman still there is a high rate of unemployment in India also the main reason is an increase in the population and lack of proper knowledge about work.

IBM said that “77% venture capitalist surveys believe that many Indian startups lack pioneering innovation based on new technologies or unique business models. Indian startups are prone to emulate already successful global idea”.

According to experts, India is follower market however, artificial intelligence machine is mainly restored in retail and banking.

Through the global study, it has been found that India comes in the bottom-most countries in terms of global innovation and the report state the reason behind this is a poor education system. On the Global Invitation Index (GII) India comes on the 66th rank also there is no doubt about India can become a global driver because we have potential to do work, a pool of talent and cultural innovation.

Also, IBM states that 70% venture capitalist claim that the main problem faced by the Indian startups are an investment of talent and there is limited availability of important skills.

Another report suggests that there were around 6’000 IT companies in the year 2016 which came down to 800 in just nine-month of 2017 this means there is a big loss in startups and also many people are getting unemployed

Head of marketing intelligence firm Rishabh Lawania also shared his view by saying “Since 2015 as many as 1,503 startups have closed down in India. The major reason is due to the replication of western ideas and not lack of subsequent funding from investor”

The main failure is being faced by eCommerce and food technology.

The chief digital officer of IBM India/South Asia Nipun Mehrotra said “the Indian startup community ranked third globally in terms of the number of startups, has been creating new job opportunities and attracting capital investment. We believe that startups need to focus on Societal Problem, including health care, sanitation, education, transportation alternate energy management and others which would help deal with the issue that India and world face. These require investment in deep technology and product which are built to scale globally”.

Now, due to pandemic situation, India’s economy is facing crucial time and for stabling, these new young entrepreneurs should come up with innovative ideas and skilled workforce which will help India to regain its economy and also soon it will be the third-largest startup country in the world and for all this hard work and creative mind is required.       

The $5 Trillion economy : reality or distant dream

The economy of India, a developing market economy as considered by many, is the 5th largest economy by nominal GDP and the 3rd largest by purchasing power parity (PPP). The IMF ranked India in 139th by GDP (nominal) and 118th by GDP (PPP). The protectionist economic policies adopted since independence and consecutively the acute payment crisis post-Cold War led to the adoption of various policies for economic liberalisation in 1991.  The 21st century has witnessed an annual average GDP growth of 6% to 7%. The years of 2014-2018 saw the unfolding of India as the world’s fastest-growing major economy, surpassing China.India’s GDP is driven by domestic private consumption making it the world’s sixth-largest consumer market at nearly 60%.  However, apart from this, the Indian economy is also stimulated by government spending, investment, and exports. India emerged as world 10th largest importer and 19th largest exporter in 2018. Statistically speaking, India ranked 63rd on ‘ease of doing business’ index and 68th on the Global Competitiveness Report. By 2019 India emerged as the world’s 2nd largest in terms of the labour force. A 2017 PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) report, India’s GDP at purchasing power parity could overtake that of the United States by 2050. India has young demography which results in a low dependency ratio, healthy savings and investments that have helped the economy to steadily grow over the years. Moreover, the incorporation of the Indian economy with the world economy has also aided this process.

The economic growth, however, slowed in response to ‘Demonetisation’ and ‘Goods and Services Tax (GST)’. Let us look at how these two measures actually impacted the economy in the beginning:

Demonetisation:                                                   

This move was announced on November 8, 2016, by the government in light of turning the economy into a “cashless economy”. This move was intended to put a dent on the practices by black money hoarders. Elimination of terror funding or fake money haunting the economy would, in turn, make it more transparent. However, pieces of evidence have shown that as time passed by, the idea behind demonetization might have failed miserably and did not achieve any significant change in the spheres of economic growth or transparency. “Let us ignore the temporary hardship, let us join this festival of integrity and credibility, let us enable coming generations to live their lives with dignity, let us fight corruption and black money,” said Modi in his speech regarding demonetisation. The government’s move caused the elimination of all Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 notes and made them invalid. These notes constituted 86.4% of total currency in circulation in the Indian markets. Disordered 3 months followed after demonetization triggering serious monetary issues for most of the Indian populace. Gabriel Chodorow-Reich of Harvard and Gita Gopinath of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in their research paper, “Cash and the Economy: Evidence from India’s Demonetisation“, claimed that this move brought down the Indian economic growth. Along with this, another unintended outcome was 2-3% reduction in jobs in the quarter of note ban. Economic activity had already deteriorated by 2.2% in November and December 2016 revealed the research. “About 1.5 million jobs were lost during January-April 2017. The estimated total employment during the period was 405 million compared to 406.5 million during the preceding four months, September-December 2017,” a report by Centre for Monitoring Indian Economy (CMIE) stated. In 2018, former RBI governor, Raghuram Rajan said, “The two successive shocks of demonetisation and the GST had a serious impact on growth in India. Growth has fallen off interestingly at a time when growth in the global economy has been peaking up.”

Goods and Service Tax:        

The government’s decision to implement Goods and Services Tax (GST) has attracted mixed reviews. The principle of “one nation, one tax, and one market” is aimed at unifying this large economy although acted as a catalyst towards the worsening situation of the economy. The inflation rate has increased from 1.79 % to 5.11 % since July 2017 and continued till January 2018. This was a result directly related to the changing demand and consumption level of the poor people in India. India’s economic growth that was 8.4% in 2015 dropped sharply to 5.7% in July 2017. This complex system of indirect tax is finally recovered from consumers of goods and services increasing in sale price. Thus, irrespective of the consumer’s financial standing pays the same amount of GST for one unit of any product or service he avails in the market and here in India. This has acted as something counter-productive to the economy. Furthermore, GST increased tax appropriated by the government, making it the second-highest tax rate in the world (28%). This has had a negative impact as 29.9% population of India lies under Below Poverty Line (BPL) and 20% of India’s population dominates 47.7% of the total wealth of the nation giving rise to high-income inequality. Also, the implementation of the scheme of GST escalated unemployment rate (3.39-6.06 %) during the period of July 2017 to February 2018 in India.

Nevertheless,Prime Minister Narendra Modi in 2019 declared that he would like India to become a $5 trillion economy by 2024. This vision has been claimed as “challenging, but achievable” by the finance minister, Nirmala Sitharam. Several scholars and researchers have claimed that for the Indian economy to grow into a $5 trillion one by 2024, it will need to grow at a rate of 12% per year. Former RBI governor, C. Rangarajan said, “$5 trillion is a good aspirational goal. But please understand that a $5 trillion economy in a matter of 5 to 6 years cannot be achieved unless the economy grows in a sustained way between 8 and 9 per cent.It has to be closer to 9 per cent because today the Indian economy is $2.7 trillion. So, $5 trillion means almost doubling the size of the economy. And that is possible only if the economy grows at 9 per cent per annum in a sustained way for 5 to 6 years.” He opined that to qualify a country as one having a developed economy, the per capita income needs to be around USD 12,000. This level of growth was pegged to be possible solely at a steady rate of 9% per annum. The blow to the economy by Demonetisation and the implementation of GST was worsened by the crisis of COVID-19. The pandemic wreaking havoc around the globe in 2020 has successfully harmed the economy of India in an unprecedented way and thwarted its plan to become a $5 trillion economy by 2024. “My own estimate is that the 21-day countrywide lockdown which has been enforced, itself will result in shaving off at least 1 percentage point of GDP. And if you take earlier problems created by the coronavirus pandemic before the lockdown and the uncertainties of the future, then a 2 percentage points decline in growth rate (for 2020-21) is not unlikely at all,” said former finance minister Sinha. The economy took a hard hit as a result of the nation-wide lockdown to curb the pandemic. People are unable to work, supply chains have been gravely affected, and the labour has been forced to migrate back. The revised Gross Domestic Product (GDP) estimates for India downwards by 0.2-4.8% for the fiscal year 2020 and by 0.5-6% for the fiscal year 2021. Another major barrier to India’s economic growth is that it relies heavily on Chinese imports. Electronic imports to India account for 45%, automotive parts and fertilizers are pegged at 25%, active pharmaceutical ingredients range from 65-70%, and there is around 90% import of mobile phone from China to India. The discontinuation of these imports has given rise to several issues in the market which most probably will lead to an increase in the prices. Moreover, the recent clash between India and China will also have a serious impact on the economy. Furthermore, data reveals that 72% of the Indian companies are located in China (Shanghai, Beijing, provinces of Guangdong, Jiangsu, and Shandong). These provinces were the first to get the hit by a coronavirus. Thereby, leading to a complete stop at their activity. The effect of the pandemic has been felt by almost all business sectors. This hit will lead to a decrease in the GDP of 2021 and thus, we can bid goodbye to the dream of the emergence of the Indian economy as a $5 trillion giant. In addition to this, the MSME sector accounts for 30% of our country’s GDP which is at the moment at a vulnerable position due to the restrictions imposed. Statistics have shown that the dependence of Indian economy on three major contributors to GDP, namely,‘private consumption’, ‘investment’, and ‘external trade’ will all be affected immensely and thus, will cause a great deal of damage to the economy. In the backdrop of all these issues, the growth of the Indian economy into $5 trillion seems to be something impossible. The target set by Prime Minister Modi to make India a $5 trillion economy by 2024-25 might be delayed by 2 years even if the economy grows at a steady rate of 7.5% a year on average post current financial year. This is rate is, however, based on the 4.5% inflation rate that the economic survey for 2019-20 explained to achieve the target. To push the economy towards the goal, an increase of investments are required. Hence, infrastructure development is considered to be a critical aspect for achieving a $5 trillion economy as it can kick start a cycle of investments. However, the prevailing situation impedes any such measure that might help the economic situation and aidin the further realization of the dream.

Lead people with what they want.

This is the era of digitalization where everything works on the digital platform in this Social media marketing has gained immense importance in the last few years which has totally changed the working of the companies.Social media marketing is the use of social media platforms and website to promote a product or service.Social media platforms are build in such a way that they can track the progress, success, and engagement of advertisements campaigns.Companies address a range of stakeholders through social media marketing, including current and potential customers, journalist,bloggers and the general public.It is a powerful way of buisness to engage with the customers.It is form of internet marketing that involves creating and sharing content on social media platforms which creates a ‘Buzz’ among the people.It includes activities like posting text and images updates , videos and other content that drives customer engagement.Their are various platforms now a days through which we can do the marketing of product ie Facebook, YouTube, Pinterest, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn etc.Social media marketing helps in attaining number of marketing goals such as increase website traffic through Search engine optimisation, it increases brand awareness,it improves communication and interaction with audience’s by taking feedback.Someone has rightly quoted “If content is a king, then conversion is queen”.