Tag Archives: influencer

the influencer epidemic

If you told someone back in 2010 that Youtube, a website where one can do nothing but watch cat videos, and Instagram, a newly launched social media app nobody had heard about,  could be someone’s source of income, they definitely wouldn’t have believed it. Fast forward to 2020, there is no shortage of so called “influencers” who make more money within a month, than most  people will ever make at their day jobs (sad, but true). Anyone who has a platform and an audience who’ll listen to them can be deemed as an influencer, and it is a much sought after career nowadays.It is no surprise that the present day youth is gravitating towards creative and flexible digital occupations. They get to do what they love and not have their lives dictated by anyone, and the rising relevance of social media has made it possible. It is even common for people to drop out of school or quit their jobs to pursue social media.

However there is nothing inherently wrong with having a platform to express your views and talk about your life, no matter how peculiar it sounds. If used correctly, a large platform can make a huge difference. It can be used to educate the people about what’s right and what’s wrong, as well as to throw light to important issues at hand.  The problem arises when these platforms are used in the wrong way. With a massive outlet and huge audience comes the  great responsibility of recognising your influence and using it the proper way to educate the masses about the right thing, no matter how difficult it may be. Sadly, many choose to go the easy way than the right way. Recently, I have seen a massive surge in clothing hauls on Youtube. Not only do these videos provide free advertising to fast fashion brands, but also  promote reckless spending habits on stuff one doesn’t even need. Similarly, content creators whose audiences are predominantly young kids, end up ingraining harmful ideas like disrespectfulness, and sometimes even racism and misogyny in them, which is extremely damaging.

 The recent Black Lives Matter movement has shown us that many of these influencers don’t actually care about issues at hand, they just see them as an opportunity to display themselves as woke to the audiences.  I can think of  hundreds of people who posted one black square on their profiles in solidarity with black lives matter, and then went back to their regular posting schedules, instead of maybe talking more about it and raising awareness about why the movement is necessary. Many of them even showed up at protests just to get their photos taken, showing that this grave and important issue at hand was nothing more than a trend for them.

Every rose has its thorn. If someone wants to be an influencer for the fame and the money, they have to deal with the hard parts of the job. Having a huge platform is a privilege, one very few have. They should recognise their privilege, and use it in a way which is best for this world, best for humanity.

Source: https://medium.com/@mnfst/why-do-people-want-to-be-influencers-bf1c6b42b36f

Instagram Envy

Today’s world is full of influencers. What you eat, what you wear, where you go on holiday, and even what you speak is heavily influenced by social media. Although people today are smart enough to realize that it is not okay to compare yourself to other people, social media still provides you numerous opportunities to do just that.

Recall that heavy feeling in your heart when you see your friends and celebrities posting photos doing exciting things like going on long drives, attending glamorous parties, and visiting rare places. This sinking feeling is known as Instagram Envy.

Instagram is all about unadulterated voyeurism. You will not find Facebook’s messiness or Twitter’s relatable content in the posts here. Instagram is almost a photo site with built-in vintage filters idealizing your every moment. It encourages its users to create these perfect layouts of their lives, almost as if everyone is living their fairy tale.

Why Instagram Envy Happens

There is an unspoken rule adopted by the users worldwide to avoid populating the feeds with any mediocre or unedited pictures. Now you might feel that it is all about showing off to your followers, but that is not the case here. It is trying to level with everyone else posting one amazing picture after another; it is trying to feel good about yourself that you are in no way less than any of your friends. Owing to this rule, people often end up spending hours in hopes of composing an image of food as simple as a glass of coke over a dish of pizza worthy enough for their Instagram feed.

envy

The followers, on the other hand, are expected to indulge in the ethics of impress rather than confess, all the while being swept away from the sumptuous photos and chipping in with beautiful comments. Even the likes are shaped like little hearts, reinforcing in the minds of the viewers, the idea that each shot is a performance worthy of applause. Every last image is an advertisement for the self.

In a society focused on physical appearance, this is perhaps no surprise that there is an element of narcissism to Insta-bragging. People with a higher level of narcissism post more self-presented photos and update their profile picture often.

Dealing with Instagram Envy

One approach to counteract Instagram envy is to showcase love, not luxury. People who generate Instagram envy can also use the same platform to demonstrate that they understand and embrace the value of citizens of all social and economic strata by posting about them. They will gain more followers than foes by showcasing love.

instagram

Another aspect you need to understand is that living through the lens is not all bad. Social media has made us all social, without a doubt. You catch up with long lost friends in no time because you already have an idea of what is going on in their lives. But you need to accept social media for what it is – it is social and it is, after all, media. You really shouldn’t blindly believe everything you see. You learn through experience that it is better to know how to post than to boast.

Image Courtesy: Google