Category Archives: Social Studies

Energy efficiency and why you need it?

ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Energy demand is increasing worldwide. The energy market situation is heating up and energy prices are on the rise. Instabilities in many exporting and transit countries are a cause for concern and the increased combustion of fossil energy sources is accelerating climate change. An expansion of energy supply options is costly and will take time. On the other hand, increasing energy efficiency curbs energy prices, reduces dependency on energy imports, counteracts energy distribution conflicts and cuts climate-damaging carbon dioxide emissions, saves wildlife habitats, safeguards the planet, and makes sure there is energy left for future generations.

Efficient energy use, sometimes simply called energy efficiency, is the goal to reduce the amount of energy required to provide products and services. There are many reasons why homeowners should consider energy efficiency, from the clear environmental and financial benefits of cutting energy use to potential improvements in mental and physical health. Improvements in energy efficiency are generally achieved by adopting a more efficient technology or production process or by application of commonly accepted methods to reduce energy losses.

Energy efficiency is playing an increasingly vital role in our lives, for three main reasons:

The environment: The more energy we use, the more carbon emissions are pumped into the atmosphere and the more our reserves of natural resources such as oil, coal and gas are depleted. We need to reduce our reliance on these energy sources, and one way to do that is to make sure we all use energy as efficiently as possible.

The economy: The global economy is based heavily on oil and gas, and as these resources dwindle their cost will increase, causing financial imbalances around the world and resulting in energy poverty in many areas of society.

Bank balance: Nobody wants to pay more than they have to for everyday necessities like heating and hot water, so it makes sense to be energy efficient. That way you fulfill your energy needs while paying as little as possible.

For a household it means you are using less energy to do the same jobs, reducing your home’s energy waste and saving money. To effectively increase your energy efficiency involves more than just using less energy – it requires you becoming aware of how energy is used, where it’s wasted, and how it can be used more effectively and efficiently in everyday life.

Why coke studio is so popular?

Coke Studio Comes To India | Forbes India

The concept of Coke Studio begun in Brazil in 2007 with a one-time promotional project called ‘Coca Cola Zero Studio’. This was organized by the company Coca Cola and it was accompanied with the launch of a new music phone by Nokia.  A year later, this format was adopted in Pakistan as ‘Coke Studio’, a live music television reality show which showcased live versions of songs performed by artists of various music genres. Highlighting fusion music as its USP, Coke Studio became one of the most successful television programmes in Pakistan. The credit for this is often given to the show’s producer, Rohail Hyatt. This concept was then adopted in India, the Middle East and later, in Africa.  In India, Coke Studio@MTV, a collaboration of Coca Cola India and MTV India started in 2011. Leslie Lewis was the producer of the first season. While Coke Studio Pakistan has completed 12 seasons, Coke Studio@MTV has done 4 seasons until now.

The cultural music of India not only includes the two main traditions of Indian classical music called Hindustani and Karnatic classical but also involves the huge diversity of folk music. Various modifications of Hindustani classical music called the semi-classical consists of forms like thumri, dadra, qawwali, ghazal, bhajan, tappa, hori and so on.  The classical music of Pakistan is also based on the Hindustani classical music which has patronized by various empires that historically ruled the south asian region. It’s semi classical forms include ghazal, qawwali etc. Religious music like hamd, naat and nasheeds as well as its folk music are extremely popular throughout the nation.

India and Pakistan are countries that are blessed with highly diverse forms of music as well as musical instruments. Coke Studio not only takes up traditional music genres but it also incorporates several local musical instruments in each of their sessions. Fusion of different musical forms, instruments, lyrics and styles is what defines the essence of the show. This show provides a stage to both the mainstream popular singers and also to the folk or ghazal singers with no power hierarchy. This has brought the ‘not so popular’, marginalized and even unconventional music forms in a studio setting and fused it with the much successful and popular music types. It provides visibility, success and exposure to the local artists that perform in it. A survey conducted on people of age 17-30 years found that a majority of them thought that Coke Studio not only promotes culture but also, believed that it has opened a platform for folk/regional music.

Renewable sources- Future of India

Imagine waking up one day, without any natural non-renewable resources left on this earth, how will it feel? Certainly, in a sense, we will be half dead.

Without any resources,without any foundation to support livelihood on this earth, survival of the humans is equal to null. The reason for which its important today to utilize the natural resources in such a manner that it becomes a boon for the generations to come. Provision of renewable resources by the nature itself, is a remedy for the same.

In case of a country, like, India, its a icing on the cake, surrounded by water on all the three sides, bestowed with a range of seasons in the country, the location on the world map is quite advantageous for India. The presence of oceanic water and large number of rivers in the country, is a significant edge in providing with hydroelectric power to the country;along with blowing winds, at the time of autumn and winter, that is a great opportunity to grasp the use of wind energy, in performing various tasks;also, the hot summer season, when sun is at the peak, is probably best suitable in providing the solar energy to the country, that directly comes from the nature, without harming any livelihood.

Renewable sources of energy –

  • Water resources –

Water, one of the basic necessities of any humans’ life, is considered as a renewable material when carefully controlled usage and treatment is followed. If it not, it would become a non-renewable resource at the location. Hydroelectricity, is generated from the fast flowing water, which becomes a renewable source. In India, projects like, Bhakra Nagal, Damodar Valley corporation, the Kopili Hydel project, are currently in working, but a lot more can be produced using Tidal waves, which is currently in not a much use, as it could be.

  • Solar Energy

India being a tropical country, has enormous possibilities of tapping solar energy. Photovoltaic technology converts sunlight directly into electricity. Today, the solar energy is used mostly by the people living in remote and rural areas, which contributes to environmental conservation and adequate supply of manure in agriculture. The largest solar power plant of India is located at Madhapur, near Bhuj, here solar energy is used to sterlise milk cans.

  • Wind Power

India stands as a wind super power in the world. In most of the states in the country, such as, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Gujarat, Kerala, Rajasthan, and even Lakshadweep, have the largest wind farm cluster which are well known for effective use of wind energy in the country.

The above stated are the major sources of renewable energy, apart from these, Biogas, and Geothermal energy, are major renewable sources that are helpful in generating mass energy, as well as electricity. Being a progressive country, India is heading towards the development of these resources that can help control the exploitation of other natural non-renewable resources.

Where are we lagging?

Despite having the largest availability of natural renewable sources of energy, India is producing less than what its capacity enables it to. Every state of the country has some or the other resource accumulated within it. But, due to –

  • Lack of technology
  • Lack of human approach to the resources
  • Lack of precise knowledge of resources
  • Lack of interest of financial institutions to fund projects
  • Safe guard duty on imported solar panels
  • Ambiguity over goods and services tax on solar equipment
  • Low investor sentiment due to delay by discoms to clean energy developers

It has become difficult to use them, also, the presence of other natural resources that are in use, currently, people are not inclined towards using these renewable energy resources.

Plans and programs –

India’s installed capacity touched around 86GW by November end. This includes solar, wind, small hydro, biomass, waste to energy and others. Around 30GW renewable capacity including 18GW solar and 10GW wind energy is under implementation. Besides, around 40GW including 36GW solar and 3.4GW wind energy, is being tendered.

https://m.economictimes.com/industry/energy/power/india-set-to-cross-100gw-renewable-energy-capacity-mark-in-2020/articleshow/72977561.cms

Schemes such as, PM-KUSUM, SPDA, PRAAPTI, have helped the private sectors to pull up their socks and work in the director that would make the country self reliant, or Atam nirbhar. The future certainly depends on these energy resources, bringing a new stream of development into the country.

Prevention from depletion of natural resources from the earth is a step ahead, by installing the new type of techniques for the development of human race.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renewable_energy_in_India

Various Types of Democracies

In Modern times, democracy seems to have triumphed. Most countries today either are or pretend to be democracies. Their political system may vary, but they all claim that system may vary, but they all claim that these are based on popular sovereignty. It means that the authority of the state belongs to the means that the authority of the state belongs to the people who are citizens of that state. The different types of democracies discussed below.

Direct Democracy: – In this form, the right to make political decision rests in the entire body of citizens, unmediated by a political organization such as parties. The examples of direct democracy can be found in Greece of the 5th century BC and contemporary Switzerland. Indirect Democracy, citizen involvement or participation is personal but in a representative democracy, it is through people chosen by them, to speak for them.
In Modern times some states have combined representative democracy with measures of direct democracy, in that they refer certain matters to the vote of the city as a whole be a referendum. Thus direct democracy can be practised in the form of a referendum.

Representative Democracy: – It is a form in which citizens elect their political representatives through periodic, popular elections, who then represent the people in the government at national (in a parliament) or local (in local authority or city council) level. In this form of democracy, the people have no direct power.

Deliberative Democracy: – It is a form of democracy which stress on the participation of the people in collective decision- making through a process of rational and considered deliberation. In simplest terms refer to the conception of democratic government secures the central places for reasoned discussion in political life.

Liberal Democracy: – Liberal democracy is a form of representative democracy where the political power of the government is tempered by a constitution which protects the right and freedom of individuals and minorities.

Illiberal Democracy: – It is a political system where democratic election exists, and the govt. is not constrained from encroaching on the liberty of individuals, or minorities. Some critics of illiberal regimes now suggest that the rule of law should take precedence over democracy, implying a de facto western acceptance of what are called ‘liberalized autocracies’.

Participatory Democracy: – It is an alternative label for direct democracy. However, it does have a slightly wider connotation because participation need not necessarily mean ultimate decision- making power. Thus if there is a much greater degree of citizens participation in a political system, though the ultimate decision making and law-making functions are given to a small body of elected representatives. It is known as a participatory democracy.

Social Democracy: – It is a label used to indicate a reformist and non-Marxist left-of-centre party. Many social democratic parties in the world are inspired by socialism that for ideological or pragmatic reasons opted for a strategy of gradual change through existing institutions. Social democratic parties may also work for liberal reforms before introducing more profound social change. Social democrats reject the sudden revolutionary change. A social democratic party is likely to favour higher proportional direct taxation for a more equitable distribution of wealth and a social net for the weak and the vulnerable.

PM Modi announced Aatmanirbhar Innovation Challenge to techies and start-ups, after banning 59 Chinese apps in India

Prime Minister on Saturday announced the Aatmanirbhar Innovation Challenge, inviting India’s tech and community to create an Aatmanirbhar App Ecosystem.

The project was launched by the Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology (MeitY) in partnership with the Atal Innovation Mission and government think-tank Niti Aayog.

“Today there is immense enthusiasm among the tech & start-up community to create world-class ‘Made in India’ Apps. To facilitate their ideas and products @GoI_MeitY and @AIMtoInnovate are launching the Aatmanirbhar Bharat App Innovation Challenge,” he tweeted.

PM Modi also urges the techies and start-up community to participate if they have such a vision and expertise to create the products.

“This challenge is for you if you have such a working product or if you feel you have the vision and expertise to create such products. I urge all my friends in the tech community to participate.” PM Modi tweeted.

Addressing the tech community through a post on LinkedIn, PM Modi said: “Today, when the entire nation is working towards creating an Aatmanirbhar Bharat, it is a good opportunity to give direction to their efforts, momentum to their hard-work and mentorship to their talent to evolve Apps which can satisfy our market as well as compete with the world.”

This challenge will run in two tracks–Promotion of existing apps and development of new apps.”Track-01 will work in mission mode for identifying good quality Apps for the leader-board and shall be completed in around a month. The Track-02 initiative will work to help create new champions in India by providing support in ideation, incubation, prototyping, and roll out along with market access,” he wrote in the post.

The first track of the challenge is being launched in eight categories, which includes Office Productivity & Work from Home, Social Networking, E-Learning, Entertainment, Health & Wellness, Business including Agritech and Fintech, News and Games.

The outcome of this challenge will be to give better visibility and clarity to existing Apps to achieve their goals and to create tech products to find solutions to tech conundrums with the help of mentorship, tech support, and guidance during the entire life-cycle, he wrote.

After the banning of 59 Chinese apps –Tiktok, Helo Mi community and 56 others– in the country it will be a great opportunity not only for the existing tech companies but also for the start-ups too.

Prime Minister Modi in his post said that there is tremendous scope among these sectors for new Apps that solve specific issues for India and the world.”Can we think of making traditional Indian games more popular via Apps? Can we develop Apps with targeted and smart access to the right age group for learning, gaming, etc? Can we develop gaming apps for people in rehabilitation or getting counselling to help them in their journey? There are many such questions and technology alone can creatively give answers,” said PM Modi.

With this statement he questioned as well as challenged the Indian techies to utilise this opportunity for the betterment of the Nation.

This innovation challenge can be accessed through the MyGov platform from July 4. Companies will have to submit their entries by July 18 through an online submission process.

The government will provide the assistance for each of the tracks, which will include personnel from the private sector and academia to evaluate the entries.

Post evaluation, these apps will be given awards and features on “leaderboards for information of citizens”. The government has allocated ₹20 lakh, ₹15 lakh and ₹10 lakh for the first, second and third placed apps in each category. Further the winners of sub-categories will get ₹5 lakh, ₹3 lakh and ₹2 lakh for first, second and third position, respectively.

Why you should try yoga?

Top 10 Unexpected Health Benefits of Yoga | Shape

What is yoga, and why is it so popular? Yoga is a series of stretches and poses that you do with breathing techniques. It offers the powerful benefits of exercise. And since yoga is gentle, almost anyone can do it, regardless of your age or fitness level.

Yoga is a 5,000-year-old discipline from India. It was developed as a practice to unite the mind and body. There are many branches of yoga. All yoga styles can help balance your body, mind, and spirit, but they achieve it in various ways.

A study in The Journal of Alternative and Complimentary Medicine (among others) shows that yoga can build strength in addition to flexibility. And flexibility is the key to strength. When your muscles and the tissues that surround them are super tight, you’re not able to move as much weight with a full range of motion in the gym. Doing yoga helps loosen up those tissues so you can get more out of your strength sessions.

Research in the International Journal of Yoga shows that yoga not only reduces stress, but can help lower anxiety and depression, too. (It can also help battle insomnia, helping people who have it to sleep sounder at night, per researchers in Southern India.) There are as many types of yoga as there are machines in the gym, each having their unique benefits. There’s something for everyone: From hot yoga to aerial yoga to a good ‘ol Vinyasa flow to Ashtanga and Kundalini.

A study in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology found that yoga can ward off heart disease helping to keep your heart in good form. Since that’s one of the key reasons people do cardio in gyms, to boost heart health, it’s interesting to note that similar benefits can be reaped from a yoga class. The twisting, stretching and folding of a yoga practice are good for the digestive system, the circulatory system, the lymph system and more. It’s a great way to detox the body and can improve your cardiovascular system. And all this while developing stronger muscles. A gym workout is focused just on strengthening muscles and boosting cardio.

Yoga is a different experience in a yoga studio, but you can easily practice yoga at home, outside or in small spaces. All you need is about 6 feet by 4 feet and you have your own yoga studio. A gym workout requires more equipment and more space.

Yoga eases your aches and pains. A gym workout increases them. Yoga slowly stretches muscles and opens the energy channels of the body. The increased flexibility keeps muscles and joints lubricated and healthy. Weights and treadmill can cause strain which leads to soreness and injuries.

Yoga helps you breathe easier. During times of stress, it’s easy to forget to breathe, really breathe, and not just shallow breaths. Without deep breaths, it’s harder to think clearly and fatigue can set in. Yoga focuses on the breath so that when you need it most, those deep breaths are the norm.

Indian states and their beautiful attires

India is a country with 29 states and each state had its traditions and values. People follow different religions, speak different languages, and eat different foods. Likely there exists a fashion and style diversity in India. Still, India is United as a country. Unity in diversity exists in India.

Here are some of the beautiful and Elegant Indian dresses which signify each state, and reveal the diversified beauty in it.

Madhya Pradesh

The people of MP wear very simple dresses compare to other states. Simple yet beautiful fashion style of these people includes Dhoti and Kurta or a simple shirt with a specific type of jacket called the Bandi or Mirzai and an equally unique headgear, a turban called the Safa which the men of this state wear.

Bandhej sari is very famous in the state still women folk wear Lehenga and choli with an Orhni called Lugra.

Uttar Pradesh

The women of this state wear salwar kameez. Churidaar bottom is originated from this state. Women also wear Ghagra Choli and Saree here. While men wear Lungi Pajama with headgear (topi or pagri) and sherwani on traditions days.

Chhattisgarh

Women wear saree known as Lugda with a blouse named Polka. They wear the saree in a typical Kachmora style. Men wear dhotis and headgears like cotton turbans.

Maharashtra

Nauwari saree the saree with 9-yard length is worn up to knee-length with beautifully designed Choli. The saree is worn with a different style like Dhoti.

Men of this state wear Dhotis known as Dhotar along with short sleeve shirts called Pheta and headgears called Pagdi.

Gujarat

Gujarat Chaniya Choli is world-famous which includes Ghagra, Choli, and chunari or head veil. These dresses are found in different color combinations which look very beautiful.

Gujarati men wear dhotis or churidar pajamas and kurtas or Bandits, traditionally called Chorno and Kediyu that are paired with rich colored headgear as the turbans.

Punjab

Patiyala salwar and churidar are common wears of the women of this state. Women also wear colorful Ghagras.

  Common attire of the men of the state is kurta and muktsari pajamas, which has replaced the more traditional tehmats. They also wear Pagris.

Rajasthan

The men of the state wear dhotis or churidar pajama, kurta, angarkha, patka, or Kamar band and white Pagar or safa which is a kind of turban, Give them a royal look. However, the length and manner of wearing the dhoti vary across the state as does the length of women’s dress as well.

Rajasthani women wear long skirts called ghagra with blouses called Kanchi or Kurtis and cover their heads with Odhnis.

Himachal Pradesh

It is a hilly and cold state so people wear woolen clothes here. Men wear kurtas paired with dhotis or churidar pajamas and the typical Himachali cap called the pagri.

while Himachali women wear kurtas, rahide, and Ghagra Lehenga Choli, along with scarves and shawls. Rahides are headscarves decked with a golden periphery that serve to protect against the cold. Pashmina shawls from the region are one variety of woolen clothing popular all over for the warmth and quality it endows.

Telangana

Telangana has sarees, Langa vonis, salwar kameez as the traditional attires for women in the state on the other hand males wear the traditional dhoti called the Pancha.

Sikkim

The traditional wear of this state is quite similar to men’s and women’s clothes. The men wear a dress called Bakhu or Kho with a pair of loosely fitted trousers teamed up with a leather belt and embroidered leather boots. While the women wear the outfit over a full-sleeved silk blouse known as honju and fastened with a silk or cotton.

 An ankle-length costume worn like a sari called the Dumvum and another attire by the name Nyamrek also counts among the traditional attires of the state.

Uttarakhand

Women of this state wear long skirts known as ghagri along with a choli and odhani. on the other hand, men wear dhoti, churidar or lungi along with a shirt or kurta, and topped off with a gol topi or Jawahar topi. Bhotu and Dhoti are unisex traditional attires of the state.

Tripura

Women of Tripura with two pieces dress the upper piece known as Risa which covers the chest and Rikutu covers the entire torso. While the dress for the lower half of the body for Tripuri women is called the Rigwnai.

The Rikutu is also worn by the men of Tripura to cover the loin. The upper male body is covered in a shirt ‘kamchwlwi borok’ along with a gamucha known as Kubai.

Manipur

The women of the state of Manipur wear a sarong wrapped around the chest as a skirt that is called the Phanek. A horizontally and woven shawl or dupatta called the Innaphi goes around the upper body to complete the traditional female attire.

The menfolk of the state of Manipur wears a dhoti that is four to five meters in length and jacket as their traditional dress. The look is completed by a white pagri or turban as the headgear.

Tamil Nadu

Kanchipuram Sarees the Women’s attire of Tamil Nadu is world-famous. These rich culture sarees called Pavada comprise a full-length short blouse called Ravaikai and a shawl, which are mostly worn by the younger girls. The grown-up girls wear a saree style called the Dhavani.

While the men in Tamil Nadu dress up in Lungis along with a shirt and Angavastra. The traditional Lungi of the Tamils is known as the Veshti and can be tucked in a number of ways.

The Indian Parliament: Performances and Challenges

As the central legislative body in India, the Parliament has four main roles—it makes laws, it holds the executive to account for its actions, it allocates government finances, and represents the interests and aspirations of citizens. The Parliament is also a constituent body in the sense that it can amend the Constitution.

Functioning of Parliament

Over the years, the Parliament has been meeting for a fewer days. Figure 1 shows that the number of sitting days has declined from 125-140 in the 1950s to about 70 days in the last twenty years. Also, disruptions have further reduced the amount of time available for discussion in Parliament.

An important casualty is Question Hour. If the House is disrupted, it often sits late or through the lunch hour to make up for lost time. However, the time lost in Question Hour is never made up. As a result, only a few questions listed for oral answers are actually answered on the floor, and the rest get a written.

The shortage of time has also affected discussion on bills. Every bill is expected to go through three readings at the stage of introduction, consideration when there is a detailed discussion on each clause, and passing. The Parliament rarely discusses any bill at the first or third reading. Many bills are not discussed at the consideration stage either,

Areas of Reform

There are some structural issues that need to be addressed to improve the effectiveness of Parliament. These include the repeal of the anti defection law, recording all votes on bills and major debates, referring all bills to committees and strengthening the support system for committees.

The Anti-Defection Law
Anti-defection law when it was passed, it aimed at bringing down the political defection but due to ever increasing political dishonesty and corruption this law never developed properly and now a question arose that ‘whether achieving the goals of this law a reality or a myth ? ‘Politicians found loopholes in this law and used it for their own benefit. It is high time that a watchdog should be provided to our Parliament and there is a need for our constitutional pundits to revisit the issue to combat the menace of corruption and defection which has eroded the values ​​of democracy.

Committee System

Committee System has following disadvantages:

  1. High Cost in Time and Money
  2. Indecisive Action
  3. Compromising Attitude
  4. Dominance of a Few
  5. Suppression of Ideas
  6. Splitting of Responsibilities
  7. Political Decision

Departmentally Related Standing Committees

Of course, there is no one right answer about the benefits of standing committees. But, I do have a bias against standing committees that have been around forever without revisiting their purpose.

What is the purpose of the committee? Is their charge clear? Is it defined in terms of outcomes that benefit the organization? What has the board delegated to this committee and is the board providing oversight to assure that the assigned work is getting done? If you have a current strategic plan, is the committee assigned strategies and outcomes that support advancement on that plan?

Committees that have a long history frequently, but not always, end up acting independently of the organization’s envisioned future and strategic direction. That committee’s work may or may not support the current strategic plan. There is a comfort zone for individuals who have been on a committee and in a position to define their own work and see it as somewhat independent of the rest of the organization.

If this is true of the standing committees of your organization, it might be worth an investment of the board’s time to review all committee charges (purpose statements, commissions, whatever you want to call it) and determine how those committees can best support the strategic plan and strategic initiatives. It may mean rewriting or refining the current committee purpose statement in terms of outcomes. In my experience, when the delegation of work to a committee changes from what the committee has comfortably done over the past many years, the folks on the committee will grumble and then, when held responsible for the outcomes, will either jump in and contribute or leave.

If you decide on investing in revisiting the objective statements of all committees, it may also help the board identify the right person to be the next chair – someone who is on board with outcomes and board oversight.

Committee on Subordinate Legislation

● No parliamentary deliberation – Parliament does not get a chance to debate rules, regulations, etc. made by the executive. These are made in the ante-chamber of the bureaucrat and the benefits of parliamentary deliberations are lost.

● No prior publicity- Whereas drafts of bills are often published for public comment and criticism, prior publicity is not always possible in case of rules and regulations and the benefits of public discussion are criticism is lost.

● Not enough publicity- Everyone is supposed to know the law because statutes are, generally speaking, easily accessible. This is not so in the case of delegated legislation, where the mass of rules, regulations, bye-laws, orders, etc. often lie buried in the files of bureaucrats. Antecedent publicity, that is, publicity before enactment is often missing in delegated legislation.

● Lesser research- Since statutes are normally given greater publicity than rules and regulations, the former can reach out to a greater number of citizens.\

● Possibility of overreach and or overlapping – as delegated legislation can often be confusing, complex and difficult to understand. Moreover, it can be different (and at times, contradictory) in different states, thus leading to confusion and lack of uniformity.

● Possibility of poor drafting – Delegated legislation may not be well considered or drafted by legislative experts and may thus suffer from infirmities due to poor drafting.

● Possibility of confusion- Experiences show that delegated legislation can often be confusing, complex and difficult to understand. Moreover, it can be different (and at times, contradictory) in different states, thus leading to confusion and lack of uniformity.

Conclusion
Parliament plays a central role in the Indian system of representative governance, affecting all aspects of lives of citizens. It has done a remarkable job for nearly seventy years, helping manage internal tensions of perhaps the most diverse set of people in any country. Many social reforms and economic progress have been led by Parliament. However, there are ways in which its effectiveness can be improved. These include revocation of the anti-defection law, making recorded voting mandatory and strengthening the committee system

Are gyms eco-friendly?

Time to run from the 'deadmill' gym treadmill

People nowadays are more concerned about their health and are going to the gym to achieve their fitness goals. Many exercisers find that running on a treadmill is easier, and therefore more preferable, than running outdoors. Those who face seasonal allergies or live in cold temperatures seem to have no option but to remain indoors for their workouts. There is also a sense of encouragement from joining a gym. By getting on the treadmill at their local club, they are now a part of a group who strive to be healthy. But by jumping on a piece of exercise equipment they may be helping their bodies but are harming the environment.

While the treadmills these gym-goers choose appear to be rather simple machines that wouldn’t require high amounts of power, one treadmill can burn the equivalent of fifteen 75-Watt light bulbs while in use. Most people would never want to have five lights on in their house, let alone fifteen, yet most people have no problem using a treadmill. While most treadmills are not constantly running, treadmills and other equipment still use energy while in standby mode. Some local gyms are also crowded enough that their machines are in almost constant use, burning large amounts of energy. The temperature raises in the gym, causing the use of fans and air conditioning in addition to the level that it is constantly running at. The lights at most gyms are consistently on and using electricity, even if no one is working out. The soda vending machine alone at a local gym can use about 10 times the amount of a home refrigerator.

An amazing alternative to the conventional gym is the Green Gym, a concept that allows gentle exercise out in the countryside in fresh air. Green Gyms involve members ‘working out’ by planting trees, rebuilding damaged forest footpaths or rebuilding walls. Participants have been found to exercise moderately over a period of about four hours – equivalent to a short session on a treadmill. However, the advantage is that the air is completely pure and, more importantly, the energy expended goes into producing a tangible product. This form of gentle exercise has been found to reduce heart attacks and strokes by about 50%.

Mental health organizations have commented on the well-being effects of the Green Gym. They say that people have a natural biological attraction to nature, which is often referred to as biophilia. Connecting with the natural environment can have therapeutic benefits and can significantly lower stress levels. Not only that, it can improve physical health too.

Carbon-neutral gyms are also starting to appear around the world. Many of these have environmental policies that aim to reduce waste, increase recycling and encourage users to think about the effects of their workout on the environment. Some gyms are even levying a charge on users so that tree planting projects can be resourced. One gym is able to reclaim over 800 cubic metres of rainwater from the roof. This is enough to fill their 25metre swimming pool.

So, going to the gym on a regular basis can have a great effect on your health and body. But it comes at a cost. For the discerning environmentalist, using a gym may be an acceptable option, but it is always a good idea to check that the establishment has an environmental policy, with aims and objectives clearly stated.

One Must Know About THESE Indian Cities Why Are they Famous For?

1. Lucknow

Lucknow is extremely popular for Chikan and Zaroori. Both of these are two kinds of stylish and delicate Indian embroideries. The export of these rich materials, forms a significant part of the revenue to the city. There is a huge demand of both these handcrafted embroideries, not only in India but in overseas markets as well.

2. Agra

If there is anything that comes close to the popularity of Taj Mahal from Agra, it is the delicious and popular Agra ka Petra. It is popular Indian sweet from the state. It is translucent looking, soft, chewy and candy – like, eaten dry or dipped in sugar syrup.

3. Firozabad

Firozabad located in Uttar Pradesh is mainly an industrial town located nearly 200 km away from New Delhi. This city is popularly known for its glass industry producing glass bangles or famed bangles. This city has been producing glass bangles for more than 200 years where workers are still melting glass in traditional furnace.

4. Nagpur

The city of Nagpur is mainly known for its juicy oranges and this is the reason why it is called as the Orange City. It is a major trade center of oranges cultivated in large part of the region.

5. Kashmir

Apple is probably the most ancient fruit primarily grown in Asia. But if one wants to eat the most delicious apples of wide variety then one must visit Kashmir. There are mainly 7 types of Apples grown on a commercial scale which are : Ambri Kashmir, American Tree, Red Delicious, Maharaji Apple, Hazaratbali Apple, Golden delicious apple.

6. Varanasi

A Banarsi silk Saree is a must have in every Indian women’s wardrobe. These Sarees are handwoven in Varanasi, UP. These Sarees have a blend of marvellous colours and their sheen and texture make them irresistible and are simply pieces of art.

7. Surat

Strategy is known as City of Diamonds. Today, India gives shine to 75% of rough diamonds sold globally, with Surat being the Capital of trade. Over 90% of the world’s diamond pieces are cut in Surat, contributing to about 80% of the Indian annual diamond export.

8. Kannauj

Kannauj famous for distilling of scents is known as India’s perfume capital and is famous for its traditional Kannauj Perfume, a government protected entity. Kannauj itself has more than 200 perfume distilleries and is a market center for tobacco, ittar and rose water.

9. Darjeeling

Darjeeling is famous for its tea plantations the world over. With many gardens producing the famous Darjeeling tea, this is the place to enjoy guided tours amid verdant tea estates and enjoy tea tasting sessions like a true connoisseur very good for photography with local dress. The smell of tea leaf makes us fresh.

So this was all about our popularity of Indian cities.