Tag Archives: Articles on Philosophy

The PHILOSOPHICAL QUEST – ISSN 23194634

The PHILOSOPHICAL QUEST is a journal with ISSN 23194634 that introduces students to fundamental questions in philosophy through a variety of Western and Nonwestern readings. The Nonwestern readings include classical and contemporary representatives of Asian, African, Middle Eastern, and Native American thought. Among the Western selections are classical and contemporary readings from diverse philosophical schools (analytic, positivist, pragmatist, phenomenological, and existential). Also included are selections from Latin American, Iberian, and Russian thinkers which are on the periphery of the Western philosophical tradition and which tend to speak in their own unique idioms. Finally, the text includes African-American and both Western and Nonwestern feminist authors. Greek philosophersTHE PHILOSOPHICAL QUEST highlights the parallels and differences between Western and Nonwestern philosophical traditions and present philosophers from different cultures in dialogue with one another, thus enriching and expanding the philosophical issue itself. Each chapter in this text has two or more sections with a general introduction to each chapter and a separate introduction to each of the sections within the chapter. THE PHILOSOPHICAL QUEST provides questions for discussion at the end of each section within the chapter, and explanatory footnotes with the readings. This text has a larger number and diversity of Nonwestern readings combined with Western readings than any other presently existing introductory philosophy text.

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POPPER AND THE WORKING SCIENTIST ON LOGIC AND METHOD OF SCIENCE

BY

IFECHUKWU J. NDINEFOO, PhD, SENIOR LECTURER,

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY, NNAMDI AZIKIWE UNIVERSITY, AWKA, NIGERIA.

Abstract

The maturity of science in the physics of Copernicus, Galileo, and Newton brought with it philosophical, logical and methodological questions of its development. Such questions crystallized in robust, fecund and, sometimes acerbic, debates on the philosophy, logic and method of science amongst scientists and philosophers. This is to be expected because every mature discipline lays its rational foundation and defines its boundary by its philosophy, logic and method and these questions hardly go without debates. Karl Popper’s philosophical and methodological writings were mainly dedicated to articulating the rational foundation and logical-cum-methodological boundaries of science striving, in so doing, to demarcate science between non-science. Popper’s tool in the effort to demarcate science and non-science is his methodological criterion of falsficationism propounded in his magnum opus, Logic of Scientific Discovery 1968. The thesis of falsificationism is that a scientist should strive to falsify his theory and not to confirm it. This is contrary to the traditional inductivist or verificationist methodology of searching for confirming instances. Popper conceives the falsificationist methodology as a bulwark against dogmatism in science and authoritarianism in politics. But the scientist in his daily work employs induction and its attendant assumptions and questions the claim that a scientist should work to falsify his theory, among other heuristic components of falsificationism. Thus, a fortuitous debate ensued between Popper and his supporters on one hand, and the working scientist and his supporters, on the other hand. The result is a rich corpus on the logic and method of science. This essay x-rays such debate between Popper and the working scientist and, in so doing, contributes to the corpus.

KEYWORDS: WORKING SCIENTIST, LOGIC, METHOD, FALSIFICATIONISM, SCIENCE.