HEALTH CARE SYSTEM WITH UNIVERSAL GOVERNMENT FUNDED COUNTRIES VS INDIA

Healthcare comprises hospitals, medical devices, clinical trials, outsourcing, telemedicine, medical tourism, health insurance and medical equipment. The Indian healthcare sector is growing at a brisk pace due to its strengthening coverage, services and increasing expenditure by public as well private players. As the leading growing population healthcare system is indeed in those developing countries. Access to comprehensive, quality health care services is important for promoting and maintaining health, preventing and managing disease, reducing unnecessary disability and premature death, and achieving health equity in India.

Countries with universal government-funded health system

In this system (also known as single-payer healthcare) government-funded healthcare is available to all citizens regardless of their income or employment status. Some countries may provide healthcare to non-citizen residents, while some may require them to buy private insurance.

Countries with universal healthcare include Austria, Belarus, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, and the United States.

Other variants of classification

Countries with universal public insurance system, In these countries workers have social insurance. Usually government withholds part of their wage, which is divided between employee and employer.

Countries with universal public-private insurance system, In this system some people receive healthcare via primary private insurance, while people who are ineligible for it, from government.

Countries with universal private health insurance system, In this system people receive healthcare via mandatory private insurance, usually subsidised by the government for low-income citizens

Indian Healthcare system:

In India, the hospitals are run by government, charitable trusts and by private organizations. The government hospitals in rural areas are called Primary Health Centres (PHCs). Major hospitals are located in district headquarters or major cities. Apart from the modern system of medicine, traditional and indigenous medicinal systems like Ayurvedic and Unani systems are in practice throughout the country. The modern system of medicine is regulated by the Medical Council of India, whereas the alternative systems recognised by Government of India are regulated by the Department of AYUSH (an acronym for Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha & Homeopathy) under the Ministry of Health, Government of India. PHCs are non-existent in most places, due to poor pay and scarcity of resources. Patients generally prefer private health clinics. These days some of the major corporate hospitals are attracting patients from neighboring countries such as Pakistan, countries in the Middle East and some European countries by providing quality treatment at low cost. In 2005, India spent 5% of GDP on health care, or US$36 per capita. Of that, approximately 19% was government expenditure.